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NAVMED P-5084 



GUIDE FOR MEDICAL PERSONNEL 

AUGMENTING 

FLEET MARINE 

AND 

AMPHIBIOUS FORCES 




1 JULY 1972 






NAVMED P-5084 






GUIDE FOR MEDICAL PERSONNEL 

AUGMENTING 

FLEET MARINE 

AND 

AMPHIBIOUS FORCES 







• 



1 JULY 1972 






< 






FOREWORD 






1 July 1972 

This guide is to provide practical information for medical department 
personnel who have been designated to augment the medical resources of the 
Amphibious Forces and the Fleet Marine Force if required. Military contingen- 
cies, disaster relief operations, and fleet exercises are the principal occa- 
sions which require augmentation of the peacetime medical support structure 
of these Forces. Under the Joint Service concept, U.S. Navy medical personnel 
may be ordered to augment other U.S. Armed Forces or Allied medical units. 

Numerous changes in the procedure for such augmentation have occurred 
since this Guide was first issued. The present edition supersedes the original 
undated (1965) edition, copies of which should be destroyed. 

Emergency augmentation of Amphibious and Fleet Marine Force units may be 
accomplished by using teams or by using individual members of the medical de- 
partment. Guidance for both groups is furnished. The information presented 
supplements and expands current official instructions. The Guide in itself is 
not directive in nature and if discrepancies exist the latest instruction shall 
be considered governing. 

The capability to provide emergency medical/dental augmentation of the 
operating forces is a fundamental responsibility of the Navy Medical Department 
and all its members. Although it is seldom required, we must ensure that this 
augmentation is a smooth, successful operation. I have been pleased with the 
response of several of our teams called out for emergency deployment in the past 
few years. Practice is essential to maintain this capability and augmentation 
personnel may anticipate that they will periodically participate in Fleet exer- 
cises. Commanders of medical activities tasked to provide augmentees to the 
operating forces shall actively encourage designated augmentees to familiarize 
themselves with this publication. 

Comments and recommendations for changes in future editions are invited. 



G. M. DAVIS ■ 
Vice Admiral, MC , USN 
Surgeon General 






PREFACE 

The primary responsibility of the medical department of the Navy is to 
provide medical care and treatment for the sick and injured members of the naval 
service. In peacetime this medical service is provided principally in the shore 
establishment where the majority of medical personnel are stationed. During 
this time the operating forces are maintained at reduced levels with a medical 
service geared to peacetime needs. In casualty-producing situations, the 
medical services of the operating forces must be expanded by additional person- 
nel, facilities, and equipment. Therefore, experienced medical personnel work- 
ing in the shore establishment can expect to be assigned to augment the oper- 
ating forces when those forces are ordered into casualty-producing situations. 
When amphibious operations are imminent, the medical services of both the Fleet 
Marine Force and the Amphibious Forces of the Fleet require immediate augmenta- 
tion. 

• 

Every member of the medical department should fully understand this aug- 
mentation concept, should recognize that it is the responsibility of the Medi- 
cal Department to provide this kind of support, and should expect assignment 
(through one of the several methods of augmentation) to the operating forces in 
emergency situations. 

Those in command of medical personnel in the shore establishment have the 
responsibility to select qualified individuals for augmentation duty, to train 
these personnel to be competent under field operating conditions, and to be cer- 
tain that they are prepared for deployment. Those who are selected for aug- 
mentation duty have the responsibility to learn the nature and functions of the 
fleet and field organizations, and the requirements of their assignment. They 
must acquire a full understanding of the role they are to play in the operating 
forces and prepare themselves for emergency deployment. Medical personnel 
called upon to augment operating forces must be prepared to begin immediate 
casualty care and treatment procedures either in combat operations or disaster 
areas. 

At times the medical specialist may be called upon to support an operating 
force engaged, not in combat, but in a diplomatic show of force. Medical per- 
sonnel should understand the necessarily indefinite nature of such contingency 
operations and be prepared to adjust to the possible medical inactivity of the 
situation. Impatience regarding seemingly unnecessary delays and inactivity is 
understandable and every effort is made to preclude assignment of specialty 
teams to fleet operations which are unlikely to result in casualties. 

The medical personnel who serve as augmentees fill a vital gap in the oper- 
ating forces during emergency operations. Even if their services are never 
fully used, their presence assures the Navy and Marine Corps of full operational 
capability regardless of the situation. 

This guide is designed primarily for medical department personnel who may 
be assigned, either individually or as members of teams, to augment the Amphi- 
bious. Forces or Fleet Marine Forces during an emergency. Information of 
primary interest to hospital commanders and force medical officers is contained 
in current SECNAV, BUMED, and SUPERS Instructions. 



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ii 



CONTENTS 












Page 



Foreword i 

Preface ii 

Contents iii 

The Augmentation Plan 1 

The Concept 1 

Basis for the Augmentation Plan 1 

Organizations Requiring Augmentation ' 2 

Skill Requirements -t 2 

Augmentation Assignments 3 

Sponsors 3 

Deployment Procedures 4 

Command Relationships 5 

Augmentation Teams 6 

Surgical Teams ■ ■ 6 

Designated Surgical Team Sponsors 7 

Surgical Team Composition 7 

The Surgical Team in Operation 8 

Surgical Support Teams 9 

Designated Surgical Support Team Sponsors 9 

Surgical Support Team Composition 10 

Surgical Support Teams in Operation 11 

FMF Surgical Platoon Cadres 12 

FMF Surgical Platoon Cadre Composition 12 

FMF Surgical Platoon Cadre in Operation 13 

Special Teams 14 

Sponsors of Special Teams 14 

Special Teams in Operation 15 

Individual Augmentation Assignments 15 

Training for Augmentation Duty 16 

Team Training — 18 

Individual Augmentee Training 18 

Reference Material 19 

Correspondence Courses > 20 

Training Films 21 



iii 



CONTENTS (Continued) p age 

Amphibious Operations and Forces 21 

Task Force Terminology 22 

Amphibious Task Unit/Marine Amphibious Unit (ATU/MAU) 22 

Amphibious Task Group/Marine Amphibious Brigade (ATG/MAB) 22 

Amphibious Task Force/Marine Amphibious Force (ATF/MAF) 23 

Operational Concepts : - 23 

The Seaborne Mobile Logistics Concept 24 

The Sea-Basing Concept 24 

Ships of the Amphibious Forces 24 

The Fleet Marine Force 33 

The Marine Division 33 

Force Troops 35 

The Marine Aircraft Wing 35 

Preparation for Augmentation Assignment 36 

Team Preparation 36 

Individual Augmentee Preparation 36 

Appendix A A-l 

Surgical Team 

Semiannual Pre-alert Check List 

Appendix B _ B-l 

Surgical Team 

Mount- out Check List 

Appendix C C-l 

Surgical Support Team 

Semiannual Pre-alert Check List 

Appendix D D-l 

Surgical Support Team 

Mount-out Check List 

Appendix E E-l 

FMF Surgical Platoon Cadre 

Semiannual Pre-alert Check List 

Appendix F , F-l 

FMF Surgical Platoon Cadre 

Mount-out Check List 

■ 






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IV 












CONTENTS (Continued) 



Page 



Appendix G G-l 

Sponsor ' s Individual Augmentee 

Semiannual Pre-alert Check List 

Appendix H H-l 

Sponsor's Individual Augmentee 
Mount-out Check- List 

Appendix I 1-1 

Individual Augmentee 

Semiannual Pre-alert Check List 

Appendix J ._. j_]_ 

Individual Augmentee 

Mount-out Check List 






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THE AUGMENTATION PLAN 

THE CONCEPT 

The short supply of medical personnel in the United States is also re- 
flected in the medical staffing of the Armed Forces. In peacetime the number 
of medical department personnel is normally sufficient to provide health care 
for the members of the Armed Forces and their dependents. The limited medical 
man-power precludes staffing the operational forces at combat levels. Thus, 
in case of a war or emergency, additional medical personnel are needed in the 
operating theater. There are several ways of getting the needed medical per- 
sonnel, such as calling up Reserve personnel, increasing recruiting and draft 
authority, and national mobilization. These methods require time, and in the 
meantime the operational forces must be supported by medical personnel attached 
to shore facilities. The Augmentation Plan was designed to provide medical 
personnel to satisfy such short notice needs. 

The Augmentation Plan of the Navy Medical Department provides sufficient 
personnel (prior to mobilization) to staff two Marine Division Wing teams 
(Marine Amphibious Forces or "MAF's") and the amphibious ships necessary to 
deploy them. Should all of these augmentees be required, severe shortages will 
occur on the staffs of many of our hospitals. Authority to fill these vacancies 
will be requested if the forces are committed to combat or if the crisis proves 
to be of prolonged nature (as in Vietnam). 

The Augmentation Plan is based on using teams of medical personnel, com- 
prised of staff personnel of selected naval hospitals, provided with prepacked 
air- transportable equipment. Additionally, individual, predesignated medical 
personnel, principally attached to naval hospitals, may also be called upon to 
augment the operating forces. At any given time, a certain number of teams or 
individuals are on alert; the number on alert and their prescribed mount-out 
time depend upon the international political climate and the prescribed national 
defense alert level. 

The rapid turnover of medical personnel in the Navy severely limits the 
number of individuals experienced in medical service with the operating forces. 
As a result, an attempt is made to have each team participate in an amphibious 
exercise at least once annually. These exercises may take place in any part of 
the world. Local training in traumatic surgery and the problems of dealing with 
large influxes of combat casualties is strongly encouraged. 

BASIS FOR THE AUGMENTATION PLAN 

The plan is promulgated in various official instructions from the Secretary 
of the Navy and the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. The basic instructions are: 

SECNAV INST 6440.1 series which assigns to certain Navy activities 
the responsibility for providing the Navy personnel needed to bring 
two Marine Amphibious Forces up to full combat strength for deploy- 
ment. (This includes chaplains, legal officers, and naval gunfire 
specialists as well as medical personnel.) 

BUMEDINST 6440.1 series which establishes surgical teams, surgical 
support teams, FMF (Fleet Marine Force) Surgical Platoon Cadres, and 
other special teams at various naval hospitals and describes the 
procedures for their deployment, training, equipping, etc. 



Authorized Medical Allowance List #635 describes the. equipment and 
supplies of a Navy surgical team. 

Authorized Medical Allowance List #670 describes the equipment and 
supplies of an FMF Collecting and Clearing Company. 

ORGANIZATIONS REQUIRING AUGMENTATION 

The plan described in this manual provides for the care of casualties occur- 
ring in the landing force and in fleet elements in the immediate vicinity of 
the landing area. If the operation is a large one, or if the enemy has the 
potential for attacking other elements of the task force, additional augmenta- 
tion may be required. The plan in this manual concerns itself only with 
landing-force elements and those ships used to transport the landing force, its 
equipment, supplies, and support elements. Other situations may require that 
other elements of the Navy (such as aircraft carriers) be specially augmented. 

Landing force elements requiring augmentation: 

Infantry and other battalions (artillery, engineer, etc.), com- 
panies, or detachments; headquarters organizations of larger units. 

Medical units (division medical battalion, "Collecting and Clear- 
ing" companies "Clearing" platoons). 

Aviation units (wings, air groups, provisional air groups, squad- 
rons). 

Amphibious force elements requiring augmentation : 

Amphibious Assault Ship, General Purpose (LHA) 

Amphibious Assault Ship (LPH) 

Amphibious Transport, Dock (LPD) (if designated as casualty re- 
ceiving ship or primary control ship) 

Dock Landing Ship (LSD) (if designated as casualty receiving 
ship) 

Amphibious Cargo Ship (LKA) (LKA-113 class only; if designated 
as casualty receiving ship) 

Amphibious Transport (LPA) (if designated as casualty receiving 
ship) 

Tank Landing Ship (LST) (if designated as casualty receiving ship) 

Amphibious Command Ship (LCC) 

Task Force and Landing Force Surgeons and Staffs; Task Force 
Medical Regulating Personnel 

SKILL REQUIREMENTS 

In the organization of medical teams, the senior member is designated 
off icer-in-charge. Every effort is made to minimize his administrative responsi- 
bilities, but certain non-medical duties and responsibilities are inevitable. 
He should have a clear understanding of his disciplinary authority and limita- 
tions, and know how to make transportation arrangements for personnel and equip- 
ments, including enroute berthing and messing if required. He should know how to 
request local assistance (particularly if deploying in foreign countries) from 
appropriate U.S. military representatives. A clear understanding of the report- 
ing and detachment procedures at the port of embarkation or rendezvous point is 
essential. He should know how to draft a message and how to use the naval com- 
munications systems. A medical officer, upon assignment as off icer-in-charge 






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of a team, is advised to discuss these matters with the administrative officer 
of his hospital. Teams may be deployed with very little notice (twelve hours 
or less). The team may not know the details of the operation, the anticipated 
casualty loads, or the casualty evacuation scheme until they join the task 
force. The off icer-in-charge must obtain this information from the ship, task 
force, or Marine element that he joins. It is his responsibility to see that 
the team accomplishes its assigned mission; the line officers to whom he re- 
ports will expect him to "take charge" and be fully responsible for his team, 
its members, and its equipment. In some cases a Medical Service Corps (MSC) 
officer has been assigned to the team to assume some of the administrative 
responsibilities; efforts are under way to make this the normal procedure. 







SPONSORS 



AUGMENTATION ASSIGNMENTS 



The commanding officer of the sponsoring hospital has the responsibility 
for forming and maintaining teams. He is also responsible for designating 
individuals to meet any additional quotas and for ensuring readiness to deploy. 
Team members, individual augmentees, and alternates must be individually iden- 
tified to BUMED semi-annually. The commanding officer must arrange training 



programs for assigned personnel, and ensure the readiness of the team equipment 
block. He must make available to the team certain Bureau-furnished publi- 
cations. He should be sure that all individuals receive the immunizations re- 
quired for Alert Forces (BUMEDINST 6230.1 series), and that they possess 
identification tags, Geneva Convention cards, and working uniforms. Surgical 
Teams 4, 10, 15, and 19 (see chart of Designated Surgical Team Sponsors, page 
7 will be provided Marine field utility clothing if activated as FMF Surgical 
Platoon Cadres. Field equipment ("782 gear": helmet, webbed belt, canteen, 
weapons, etc. ) will be provided by the host Marine unit. The hospital commander 
may delegate some of these duties to the of f icers-in-charge of teams, but he 
remains responsible for their execution. (See recommended sponsor's check 
list, Appendix A.) 

DEPLOYMENT PROCEDURES 

The first notice a hospital commanding officer is likely to receive re- 
garding deployment of augmentation personnel is an alerting call from BUMED; 
this will be followed by an official message. Normally, the Chief of Naval 
Operations authorizes direct liaison between the requesting authority and the 
hospital which has been selected to provide the augmentation team or personnel. 
Arrangement of transportation for augmentation personnel and equipment is the 
responsibility of the requesting authority (CINCLANTFLT, CINCPACFLT, CMC); he 
or a designated agency such as a Naval Air Logistic Control Office (NALCO), will 
advise the hospital commander whether or not military transportation will be 
available and the dates, places, and times of embarkation or rendezvous. 
Hospital commanders are authorized to arrange transportation to embarkation 
points or air-lift pickup points including commercial ground or air transporta- 
tion if required. The requesting authority or his designated "action" agency 
or commander, gives the final notice to the hospital commander to deploy his 
team. The hospital commander then issues appropriate Temporary Additional 
Duty orders to the personnel involved. Rendezvous points may be distant (such 
as the Panama Canal Zone, Singapore, Athens, Okinawa, etc.). A team and its 
equipment may be air lifted to an aircraft carrier and subsequently transferred 
by helicopter to an amphibious force ship. Individual patience and tolerance 
are essential during the movement phase; medical personnel should realize that 
during a crisis situation there will be many high priority movements and they 
must be prepared to wait as necessary. A liaison officer or specific point of 
contact at rendezvous sites should be designated by the requesting authority; 
team leaders should make every effort to ensure that this has been done before 
departing. Certain teams are provided with U.S. Official Passports to expedite 
overseas movement. 

The requesting authority also arranges the return transportation for aug- 
mentees. Because of heavy clinical loads at naval hospitals, commercial air 
travel should be requested by the team commander if military air travel" will 
unduly delay (72 hours or more) return of personnel to their normal duty 
stations. The equipment block should be repacked, banded to prevent pilferage, 
and returned by government air or surface transportation. If the block does 
not return with the team, the team commander should request a formal receipt 
for the equipment from the ship or unit which assumes temporary custody of the 
repacked block. If portions of equipment or supplies must be left (as sometimes 
happens in disaster relief work) a personal copy of the orders, signed and 



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certified by competent authority, should be retained. This need not be military 
in come cases diplomatic per sonnel or other government agencies (AID, etc.) may 
request retention of supplies /equipment on site. 

COMMAND RELATIONSHIPS 

Experience with special landing force operations has shown that it is 
generally preferable to order augmentees (as teams or individuals) to the 
Commander, Amphibious Task Force (or Group or Unit) who then further assigns 
them to an appropriate ship of the force. While embarked, a team commander is 
designated "Chief of Professional Service" and is responsible for professional 
coordination and performance of all embarked medical personnel in matters re- 
lated to the reception, treatment, and disposition of casualties. His author- 
ity is limited to direct medical support of the operation. The ship's medical 
officer, if one is present, retains his normal responsibility and authority for 
medical matters relating to the ship and its crew and the arrangements for 
normal sick call for embarked troops. Troop and air group medical officers 
and corpsmen will function under the direction of the Chief of Professional 
Services in matters relating to casualty reception, care and disposition. Co- 
ordination between surgical teams is effected by the Amphibious Task Force 
Surgeon (the staff medical of f icer of the Commander, Amphibious Force or "CATF"). 

When deployed with the amphibious forces, augmentation personnel are 
normally under the military command of the "numbered fleet" commander (i.e. 2nd 
Fleet in the Atlantic, 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean, 7th Fleet in the Western 
Pacific). The military chain of command passes from the Fleet Commander to the 
Amphibious Task Force (or Group or Unit) commander down through the successive 
echelons of the Task Organization. Since task forces are tailor-made for the 
particular mission, it is most important that the team commander ascertain the 
exact chain of command under which the team operates. This is easily accom- 
plished by examining the task organization as promulgated in the Operation/Plan 
order. 

, Surgical Teams assigned to Marine units are a detachment within the Landing 
Force and are under command of the Landing Force Commander. The Landing Force 
Commander may further assign teams to subordinate ground cr air units. Either 
Commander may, on the other hand, elect to retain the teams directly under his 
own control rather than under the command of subordinate unit commanders. There 
are numerous technical reasons for electing one course or the other; these 
reasons vary according to the circumstances of the planned operation. The 
important thing is that the team commander must ascertain at an early date just 
who his immediate superior is so that he knows to whom to go for assistance, 
resupply, team movement, etc. Whether a team actually "reports to" a given 
ship's captain or is simply embarked in the ship and is reporting to a higher 
commander, early establishment of a close and friendly relationship with the 
ship's captain and his executive officer is important. 

Individual augmentees fall into two classes: specialist personnel and 
general duty medical personnel. Individual augmentees are usually assigned to 
Fleet Marine Force Units. Fully trained specialists who are senior in rank, 
may initially find themselves attached to a USMC unit such as a Medical Battal- 
ion or "Collecting and Clearing" Company in which the commanding officer is 



their junior. Because tne augmentees are normally assigned for a short period 
of time, it would be wise to leave the junior officer, who is familiar with the 
unit and FMF operations, in command. If it appears that the augmentee may be 
with the unit for an extended period, he should discuss the desirability of his 
designation as commander of the unit with the appropriate common superior 
commander. 

Secret security clearances for senior team members are particularly im- 
portant. During the Cuban crisis several of our embarked surgical teams could 
not be fully briefed on the contingency plan because members lacked the neces- 
sary clearances. A situation in which team members could not be briefed obvi- 
ously could create hardships and perhaps weaken the effectiveness of those teams. 
Command personnel should be particularly aware of this and take measures to 
correct the situation where it exists. 



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AUGMENTATION TEAMS 

SURGICAL TEAMS 

A surgical team is an organized, ready-reaction group of physicians, male 
nurses, and hospital corpsmen normally based in a naval hospital. A surgical 



c 



team is pretrained and equipped to provide rapid reinforcement of medical facil- 
ities (afloat or ashore) during amphibious operations, natural disasters, or 
other situations requiring additional surgical capability. 

There are twenty surgical teams currently established. Each surgical team 
is organized so that when it is attached to a designed casualty receiving ship, 
it is able to man two operating rooms by using equipment provided in the surgi- 
cal team supply block, existing shipboard facilities and shipboard personnel 
to augment the team staff. In some fleets, surgical supply blocks are pre- 
positioned on certain ships. 

Designated Surgical Team Sponsors 

The following hospitals have been designated by BUMED Instruction 6440.1 
series (1971) to sponsor surgical teams: 

Naval Hospital Surgical Team Number (s) 

Bethesda, Maryland 
Portsmouth, Virginia 
Great Lakes, Illinois 
Oakland, California 
San Diego, California 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Boston, Massachusetts 
St. Albans, New York 
Camp Lejeune, North Carolina 
Charleston, South Carolina 
Jacksonville, Florida 
Long Beach, California 
Camp Pendleton, California 
Guam, M.I. 

•Surgical teams numbered 4, 10, 15, and 19 are dual-purpose teams and may be 
deployed either as surgical teams or, when reinforced, as FMF Surgical Platoon 
Cadres. 

Navy surgical teams are designed, supplied, and equipped to provide direct 
surgical support to any medical facility. They are not self-sufficient but 
must be provided shelter, power, berthing, messing, sterilizing equipment, and 
x-ray, laboratory, and laundry facilities. Surgical teams may or may not be 
required to bring and use their own surgical supply blocks. The normal situa- 
tion with FMF surgical platoon cadres is to use supplies provided by the host 



1 and 


2 


3 and 


4* 


5 and 


6 


7 and 


8 


9 and 


10* 


11 anc 


I 12 


13 




14 




15* 




16 




17 




18 




19* 


, 


20 





units. 



Surgical Team Composition 

Each surgical team is composed of the following male members: 

1 general surgeon (NOBC 0214) 

1 orthopedic surgeon (NOBC 0244) 

1 anesthesiologist (NOBC 0613) 

1 anesthetist (NC) (NOBC 0910) (Male) 

1 operating room nurse (NOBC 0970) (Male) 

1 administrative officer (MSC) (NOBC 0802) 



1 



3 operating room technicians (primary NEC) (HM-8483) 
2 operating room technicians (primary or secondary NEC) 
(HM-8483) 
clinical laboratory technician (HM-8417) ( 

1 medical x-ray technician (normally HMC or HMI) (HM-8352) 
1 orthopedic cast room technician (HM-8489) 
1 medical administrative technician (HMC) (HM-8442) 
1 general service hospital corpsman (HM-0000) 



The Surgical Team in Operation 

The early establishment of close and cordial working arrangements with the 
ship's officers and crew is the key to a successful support mission, whether 
the team is ordered to supplement the ship's crew, or simply to operate under 
the control of the task unit commander makes little difference. The officer- 
in-charge should establish good relationships with the ship's executive officer 
and through him keep the ship's captain fully informed as to the medical status, 
problems n and requirements. On large ships, such as the LHA and LPH, a medi- 
cal officer is assigned to the ship. The team will operate from the ship's 
sick" bay. A tactful approach will minimize friction. 

When the team- arrives at its assigned ship and the of f icer-in-charge has 
reported to the ship's executive officer and captain, an immediate familiar- 
ization survey of the ship's medical spaces should be undertaken. If the team 
has advance notice of its ship assignment, reference should be made to "Medical 
Capability Survey and Inventory of Ships of the Amphibious Force, U.S. Atlantic 
Fleet, October 1970". 

The team may decide to use existing shipboard surgical equipment (such as 
on LHA's and LPH's) or may decide to unpack its own presterilized packs. If 
the casualty load is heavy and an additional operating or surgical dressing 
room is needed, the team can unpack and set up its folding operating table and 
lights (assistance from the ship may be required). The decision will be made 
by the Chief of Professional Services with the advice of the Amphibious Task 
Force surgeon if one is deployed. 

The supplies carried in the surgical supply block are calculated to be 
sufficient for 100 major procedures. Surgical team resupply blocks are posi- 
tioned at specific advanced locations and may be requested by a priority 
message to BUMED. Prior to acceptance of casualties, it is essential that the 
following points be determined and mutually agreed upon with the ship's person- 
nel: 

Casualty movement routes (casualties may arrive by helicop- 
ter or boat) 

Triage area, equipment, personnel and procedures 

Source of whole blood — arrangements for drawing from crew 

Casualty overflow berthing spaces 

Provision for feeding non-ambulatory patients 

Preparation of skeleton clinical records 

Required reports and their transmission 

Medical communications channels, operators; requirements 
for secure voice transmissions 



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Method of further evacuation of casualties and decedents 

Arrangement with an ordnance expert to remove and dispose 
of any possible live ordnance brought aboard by or with 
the casualties 

Arrangement for stretcher bearers (four per litter) from 
ship's company or Marines 

Preparation of a morgue refrigerator for storage of re- 
mains of the deceased in body bags. (If no designated 
morgue refrigeration space exists, request assignment of 
an existing refrigerator for this purpose and equip with 
temporary shelving or scantling to support remains.) 

Early arrangements should be made to evacuate appropriate patients to CONUS 
hospitals through the JAMRO (Joint Armed Forces Regulating Office) regulating 
system, following the evacuation policy established for the operation by 
SECDEF/JCS or area commander. Such patients will be aeromedically evacuated 
by MAC (Military Airlift Command) as soon as a landing field can be secured. 
Until such evacuation is possible, berthing, messing, and nursing care must be 
provided to those patients. The Task Force Surgeon, the commanding officer of 
the ship, and the CTF should be kept apprised of the availability of operating 
rooms, post-operative beds, and any backlog (in time increments). 

In medium and large task organizations, there will be a "Force Surgeon" 
assigned to the force commander's staff. He should be contacted and, if pos- 
sible, visited. He will be keenly interested in the team and will be able to 
expedite requests for assistance. In all but the smallest operations he will 
regulate flow of the casualties to and from the various casualty receiving 
ships. When the team commander needs a "doctor-to-doctor" talk to resolve his 
problems, the Force Surgeon is the man to contact, 

SURGICAL SUPPORT TEAMS 

The surgical support team is an organized, ready-reaction group (consisting 
of a physician, a male nurse, and ten hospital corpsmen) that supplements the 
Navy surgical team. The team is trained and equipped to provide rapid rein- 
forcement of medical facilities afloat or ashore during amphibious operations, 
natural disasters, or other situations requiring support. The surgical support 
teams are designed to provide professional pre- and post-operative nursing care, 
to establish and operate a simple intensive care unit, and to assist in triage 
if required. 



Designated Surgical Support Team Sponsors 

The following hospitals have been designated by BUMED Instruction 6440.1 
series to sponsor surgical support teams: 



Naval Hospital 

Bethesda, Maryland 
Portsmouth, Virginia 
Great Lakes, Illinois 
Oakland, California 
San Diego, California 
Newport, R.I. 
Memphis, Tennessee 



Surgical Support Team Number(s) 



1 

3 

5 

7 

9 

11 

12 



and 
and 
and 
and 

and 



2 
4 
6 
8 
10 



Yokosuka, Japan 
Pensacola, Florida 
Beaufort, South Carolina 
Corpus Christi, Texas 
Orlando, Florida 
Bremerton, Washington 
Quantico, Virginia 
Key West, Florida 



13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 



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Surgical Support Team Composition 

Each of the twenty currently established surgical support teams is composed 
of the following male members: 

1 general medical officer (NOBC 0070) (partially trained 

surgeon may be substituted) 
1 nurse (NOBC 0945) experienced in intensive care 
10 general service hospital corpsmen (at least 3 must be 

trained in intensive care) (HM-0000) 

The medical off icer-in-charge should have knowledge of , and experience in, 
medical support in amphibious warfare operations. Although he is primarily 
employed as a medical specialist, it is desirable that he also possess the 
strong leadership qualities essential to the efficient operation of the team. 
The senior hopsital corpsman should be either an HMC or an HMI, preferably 
with emergency room or field hospital (casualty reception) experience. 



C 



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Surgical Support Teams in Operation 

Surgical support teams will normally be used aboard casualty receiving 
ships. There is a possibility, however, that they could be assigned to shore 
facilities in unusual situations (disaster relief, etc). 

When the patients aboard a casualty receiving ship no longer require the 
definitive care of a surgical team, the surgical team may be removed and the 
surgical support team left aboard to augment the ship's company for rendering 
medical care to casualties enroute to rear area hospitals. Whenever possible, 
air evacuation will be employed, but situations may arise in which evacuation 
by ship is the only method available. 

When deployed, surgical support teams fall under the same fleet chain of 
command as do the surgical teams. 

Organization of the surgical support team and assignment of individual re- 
sponsibilities should be accomplished prior to emergency deployment. An alert 
status system similar to that of the surgical teams is being established. Sur- 
gical support team supply blocks are also under development. 

Surgical support teams are not capable of self-support or independent opera- 
tions. Like surgical teams they must be provided full housekeeping support. 



11 




( 



c 



FMF SURGICAL PLATOON CADRES 

Surgical platoon cadres are organized ready-reaction groups of physicians, 
male nurses, and enlisted specialists based at major naval hospitals in geo- 
graphic proximity to major Fleet Marine Force garrisons in the continental 
United States. Four such teams are organized and trained to serve as the pro- 
fessional cores or cadres of Fleet Marine Force surgical ("clearing") platoons. 
They are the four designated surgical teams (4, 10, 15, and 19) previously 
described— each strengthened by the assignment of two additional medical person- 
nel. The number of surgical teams trained and reinforced to act as FMF Surgi- 
cal Platoon Cadres may vary with the international political climate. 



FMF Surgical Platoon Cadre Composition 

Surgical teams numbers 4 (NH Portsmouth), 10 (NH San Diego), 15 (NH Camp 
Lejeune), and 19 (NH Camp Pendleton) are dual-purpose teams and each may be de- 
ployed as a navy surgical team or as a surgical platoon cadre. When deployed 
as an FMF Surgical Platoon Cadre, each will be augmented by: 

1 operating room technician (primary or secondary NEC) 

(HM-8483) 
1 pharmacy technician (HM-8482) 



12 



Sponsors of teams 15 and 19, in accordance with BUMED Instruction 6440.1 
series, will also nominate (to BUMED) one Commander, MC, USN, as a prospective 
medical ("Collecting and Clearing") company commander. Upon activation of the 
FMF Surgical Platoon Cadres, the commanding of f icers of naval hospitals Lejeune/ 
Pendleton will be notified whether or not this Commander is required for the 
assigned mission. 

When deployed as Surgical Platoon Cadres, teams 4, 10, 15, and 19 will not 
deploy their surgical team supply blocks unless specifically ordered to do so. 

FMF Surgical Platoon Cadre in Operation 

When Surgical Teams 4, 10, 15, or 19 are deployed as Surgical Platoon 
Cadres with the Fleet Marine Force, they will normally mount out without their 
surgical supply and equipment blocks and will use the equipment and supplies 
provided by the unit which they join (normally one of the "Clearing" Platoons 
of a "Collecting and Clearing" Company). The basic equipment and supplies of 
these companies are very similar to those of the surgical team. They suffice 
to establish a sixty-bed field surgical hospital and maintain it in operation 
for ten days. Personnel assigned to the above teams should study Authorized 
Medical Allowance List #670. Two teams are required to provide the specialist 
staff of a "Collecting and Clearing" Company; each team is the cadre of a 
"Clearing" Platoon with a thirty-bed field facility. (New names for these or- 
ganizations have been recommended. "Collecting and Clearing" Companies will 
probably be renamed "Medical" Companies and "Clearing" Platoons will probably 
be renamed "Surgical" Platoons. ) 

In general, these field hospitals are not landed until several days after 
the initial assault. In the interim period, when the casualties may be heaviest, 
team personnel supplement the medical staffs of the ships of the task force 
under the direction of the Amphibious Task Force Surgeon (with the concurrence 
of the Landing Force Commander). 

Experiments are now underway to determine the feasibility and desirability 
of temporarily erecting field hospitals in certain ships which are not normally 
designated as casualty receiving and treatment ships. If this procedure is 
adopted teams 4, 10, 15, and 19 might be directed to actually establish a "field 
hospital" afloat with the equipment and supplies of a "Collecting and Clearing" 
Company or a "Clearing" Platoon. 

For details of organization, procedures, responsibility, resupply, etc., 
when ashore, team members should consult Fleet Marine Force Manual 4-5, Medical 
and Dental Support. A three-day orientation course at a Field Medical Service 
School is recommended before participation in a major exercise for those in- 
dividuals who have not had field experience. 

While the above teams normally deploy without their blocks and use the 
equipment of the FMF unit, other surgical teams with or without blocks, may be 
also assigned to reinforce FMF field units. This procedure was employed during 
several phases of the Korean campaign, and in certain World War II operations. 



13 




SPECIAL TEAMS 

Special teams are designated to provide reinforcement of medical facilities 
afloat and/or ashore during amphibious operations, natural disasters, or any 
other situations requiring surgical support. 

Modifications to surgical and surgical support teams in both personnel and 
equipment are made at BUMED direction to meet specific disaster or operational 
situations. Other specialty teams may be organized and deployed. The follow- 
ing special teams are under development to provide rapid response to meet 
specific medical requirements imposed by operational or disaster situations. 

Mobile Neurosurgical Team 
Oral Surgical Team 
Medical Regulating Team 
Disaster Relief Team 



( 



Sponsors of Special Teams 

Sponsors of surgical teams 1 through 10 may be directed by BUMED to aug- 
ment or substitute one Medical Officer, Obstetric (NOBC 0299); and one Medical 
Officer, Pediatric (NOBC 0701), or other specialists for disaster relief mis- 
sions. 



14 






Special Teams in Operation 

Special teams give the specialized madical support services required during 
various types of amphibious operations and/or natural disasters. They provide 
health care services for persons in need of obstetric care, pediatric care, 
neurosurgical or oral /maxillofacial treatment (157o of combat injuries). 



Special teams are not capable of self-support or independent operations. 
The teams must be attached to a medical facility of a landing force unit or ship 
which can furnish space for an operating room plus laundry, power, heat, ster- 
ilizing capability, messing, berthing, and (at least) minimal patient holding 
and administrative capabilities. In general, special teams will deploy with 
the instruments/equipment/supplies unique to their mission, but will not be 
supplied with basic surgical equipment/supplies. 










*£&W 








INDIVIDUAL AUGMENTATION ASSIGNMENTS 

Individual augmentation personnel are provided by designated activities 
in accordance with SECNAV" Instruction 6440.1 series. The responsibility of 



15 



Navy and Marine Corps activities to provide Navy specialist personnel to sup- 
port the FMF during deployment is based on SECNAV" Instruction 6440. 1 series. 
The following chart sets forth the augmentation medical officer billet re- 
quirements to bring two Marine Amphibious Forces (MAF's) to Marine Corps Table 
of Organization strength. The numbers shown vary with the peacetime staffing 
levels of FMF organizations. Similar tables exist for Dental Corps, Medical 
Service Corps, Nurse Corps, and Hospital Corpsmen= 







( 



TRAINING FOR AUGMENTATION DUTY 



Personnel who are candidates for augmentation duty assignment must be fully 
prepared to assume the duties of the assignment. The augmentee can anticipate 
demanding and strenuous work over extended periods of time aboard ship or in a 
field environment. 

Augmentation training is that supplemental formal /informal and individual 
training that enables the augmentee to function effectively in various combat or 
disaster environments. Formal training is available for FMF augmentees at the 
Field Medical Service Schools (FMSS), located at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina 
and Camp Pendleton, California. Personnel are encouraged to attend these courses 
as part of their augmentation training programs. Amphibious warfare exercises 
and field medical exercises provide excellent means for testing, evaluating 
equipment, and training augmentees. 



C 



16 





Naval 
Hospital 






POSITION, ' 


rYPE 


3F DUTY, PERSONNEL CODE 








A* 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


J 


K 


L 




Beaufort 




1 




1 


1 


















Bethesda 




2 




1 


2 


















Camp Lejeune 








1 


1 


1 
















Camp Pendleton 




2 


1 


1 


3 


















Charleston 




1 




1 


1 


















Chelsea 




1 






2 


















Corpus Christi 










1 


















Great Lakes 




1 




1 


1 


















Jacksonville 




2 




1 


1 


















Memphis 




2 




1 


1 


















Oakland 




2 




1 


1 




1 














Pensaeola 




2 




1 


1 


















Philadelphia 




1 




1 


1 




1 














Portsmouth, N.H. 




1 
























Portsmouth, Va. 




4 




1 


1 


















St. Albans 




2 




1 


1 


















San Diego 




3 




3 


3 


















BUMED 


40 




1 


9 




3 




40 


8 


2 


2 


3 




TOTAL 


40 


36 


2 


16 


33 


4 


2 


40 


8 


2 


2 


3 



* LEGEND 



A - Flight Surgeon 2100/0045 
B - Surgeon 2100/0214 
C - Opthalmologist 2100/0234 
D - Ortho Surgeon 2100/0244 
E - Anesthesiologist 2100/0613 
F - Internist 2100/0637 



G - Psychiatrist 2100/0737 
H - General Medical 2100/0070 
I - Dental G P 2200/0335 

J - Oral Surgeon 2200/0550 
K - Periodonist 2200/0560 
L - Prosthodontist 2200/0569 



Source of Medical/Dental Officer Augmentees 



17 



Although formal training courses exist to assist the augmentee in becoming 
prepared for assignment , these training courses cannot provide adequate training 
for all possible contingencies. It is, therefore, essential that each individ- 
ual augmentee strive to expand his knowledge of his specialty as it may be ap- 
plied in combat or emergency conditions, in tropical and cold weather situations. 

Officers designated as potential augmentees for the FMF should familiarize 
themselves with and maintain proficiency with the .45 caliber pistol and should 
maintain physical fitness. 

TEAM TRAINING 

The commanding officer of the sponsoring naval hospital is responsible for 
training surgical teams, surgical support teams, FMF Surgical Platoon Cadres, 
and other specialized teams as directed by BUMED Instruction 6440.1 series. 
Training should be provided under close supervision to ensure that each team is 
well-oriented and completely familiar with its equipment and supplies. Train- 
ing should be thorough and continuous to ensure capability for rapid deployment 
in order to provide superior surgical care to combat casualties or disaster 
victims under adverse conditions. 

Training should be performed at each sponsoring hospital with emphasis 
placed on traumatic surgery. The annual CINCPAC War Surgery Conference Reports 
(1967-1971) are particularly useful. Surgical team personnel must also maintain 
familiarity with the contents and functional packing of the material in the 
surgical team supply block. 

Additional training of the surgical team to provide care under seabased and 
field conditions is encouraged. Commanding officers may request availability 
periods for such training from BUMED. 

Sponsors of surgical teams 4, 10, 15-, and 19 should ensure that all team 
members lacking previous FMF experience attend an indoctrination course at an 
FMSS. Special three-day courses are available; direct consultation with the 
Commanding Officer, FMSS, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina or Camp Pendleton, 
California, is encouraged. Field training with the FMF is especially essential 
due to changes being made in field medical facilities. The Medical Unit Self- 
Contained Transportable (MUST) system of shelters and equipment is currently 
being phased into use in the FMF and will provide an environment far superior 
to tentage. 

Upon the completion of local, field, or shipboard training, the senior 
member of the surgical team should prepare a written critique of the exercise(s) 
including any recommendations. As a part of the critique, the senior member 
should certify the condition of readiness, a list of deficiencies, and a state- 
ment indicating action taken or recommended to correct discrepancies. This 
critique should be submitted to BUMED via the sponsoring hospital commander. 

INDIVIDUAL AUGMENTEE TRAINING 

The commanding of f icers of the Navy and Marine Corps activities designated 
to provide personnel for individual augmentation assignments are directed by 



c 



18 






SECNAV Instruction 6440.1 series to be responsible for their training. They 
must ensure that designated augmentees are prepared and adquately trained for 
deployment. Augmentee personnel are to be assigned for training to the FMSS 
at either Camp Lejeune or Camp Pendleton when staffing, time and funds permit. 

The keystone of the medical support to the FMF is the staffing of perma- 
nently assigned Medical Service Corps officers and enlisted personnel who have 
been trained in the logistics and operation of FMF medical units. Augmenting 
personnel should rely on these experienced personnel for guidance in the opera- 
tion of their units. It is only because of this nucleus of trained personnel 
with the FMF that the augmentation concept is possible. 






REFERENCE MATERIAL 

Candidate augmentees are encouraged to become familiar with the reference 
material related to their assignments. The following list of reference material 
provides a source of information for augmentees. Naval hospitals are encouraged 
to assist augmentees in obtaining copies of references particularly suited to 
their requirements. 



NAVY INSTRUCTIONS AND PUBLICATIONS 
SECNAVINST 6440.1 series 

BUPERSINST 6100.2 series 
BUMEDINST 6230.1 series 



BUMEDINST 6230.11 series 
BUMEDINST 6320.1 series 

BUMEDINST 6440.1 series 



BUMEDINST 6530.1 series 
NAVMED P-117 series 
NAVMED P-5010 series 

NAVMED P-5016 series 

NAVMED P-5041 series 

NAVMED P-5047 series 

NAVMED P-5059 series 

NAVPERS 10816 series 



Navy Support of the Fleet Marine 
Force 



Physical Fitness 

Immunizations Requirements 
Procedures 



and 



Malaria: Control and Prevention 

Medical Regulating to and within 
the Continental United States 

Surgical Teams, Surgical Support 
Teams, FMF Surgical Platoon 
Cadres, and Other Special Teams 
for Combat and Disaster Emer- 
gency Medical Support 

Navy Blood Program 

Manual of the Medical Department 

Manual of Naval Preventive Medi- 
cine 

Handling of Deceased Personnel 
in Theatres of Operations 

Treatment of Chemical Warfare 
Casualties 

Medical Support of Joint Operas 
tions 

Emergency War Surgery Handbook 
(NATO) 

Medical Department Orientation 



19 



NAVPERS 10817 Combat and Field Medicine Prac- 

tices 

NWP-30 Amphibious Operations 

NWIP 22-3 (c) Ship to Shore Movement 

FLEET MARINE FORCE MANUALS 

FMFM 4-1 Logistic and Personnel Support 

FMFM 4-3 Shore Party Helicopter Support 

Teams Operations 

FMFM 4-5 Medical and Dental Support 

MCO 6300.1 series Heat Casualties 

MCO 6600.1 series Fleet Marine Force Dental Serv- 

ice; Policies and Doctrines 
Concerning 

MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION SOURCES 

Federal Supply Catalog, Department of the Defense Section, Medi- 
cal Materiel Catalogs, Washington, D.C. ; Department of Defense ; 
1961 

CINCPAC Conferences on War Surgery, Volume 1-5 

Manual of Tropical Medicine , Geo. Wm. Hunter III et al. 4th edition, 
W. B. Saunders Co. , Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 1966 

Medical Capability Survey and Inventory of the Ships of the Amphi- 
bious Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet of October 1970 (and companion 
PACFLT volume when available) 

Status of World Health, U.S. Government Printing Office 

Symposium "Management of Mass Casualties", published by Medical 
Service School, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, 
Texas 

The publication FMFM 4-5, "Medical and Dental Support", is of particular 
significance to FMF augmentees; it presents doctrine, procedures and techniques 
concerning the organization, command relationships, planning considerations, 
and the employment of medical and dental units in the support of the Fleet Marine 
Force operations. It describes the organization, plans, and operations of med- 
ical and dental service within the landing force and the amphibious task force 
during all phases of the amphibious operation. Casualty evacuation, records, 
and reports during the assault stage are described. Medical and dental train- 
ing and supply procedures are outlined. It is available in the libraries of 
all naval hospitals. 

CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 

In addition to formal training, unit training, and individual on-the-job 
training, various correspondence courses are available to expand individual 
knowledge related to augmentation assignments. These courses are available from 



r 



20 



the Naval Medical School. One of the courses offered which should prove bene- 
ficial to the augmentee is "Combat and Field Medicine Practice", NAVTRA 10706-B. 

TRAINING FILMS 

Training films related to medical support afloat and ashore are available. 
They are especially useful in the development of unit training programs. NAVMED 
P-5042, 1970 and NAVMED School Medical Film Catalog, 1972 are film reference 
guides for medicine and allied sciences. They list films available for loan 
from the following agencies: 

Department of the Army — Office of the Surgeon General 

Department of the Navy--Bureau of Medicine and Surgery 

Department of the Air Force — Office of the Surgeon General 

Armed Forces Institute of Pathology 

Department of Health, Education, and Welfare — National Library of 

Medicine 
Veterans Administration--Department of Medicine and Surgery 

Some of the films which should be of special interest to augment ees are: 

"The Surgical Team in Amphibious Support" (MN-10488) 
"Medical Support in a Marine Expeditionary Force" (MN-9513A) 
"Medical Support in a Marine Amphibious Assault: The General and 

Special Situation" (MN-9513B) 
"Medical Support in a Marine Amphibious Assault: The Medical Plan" 

(MN-9513C) 
"Medical Support in a Marine Amphibious Assault: Conduct of the 

Landing" (MN-9513D) 
"The Medical Officer Aboard Ship" (MN-8265) 
"Medical Planning for a Task Force Operation" (TF8-1761) 
"Medical Service in the Jungle" (FB 8-147) 
"Medicine Hits the Beach" (MN-3732) 

AMPHIBIOUS OPERATIONS AND FORCES 

Amphibious operations involve the assembly of an assault force, transit to 
the area of operation, and movement ashore. The assault itself may be mounted 
by air (helicopters) or surface (landing craft) or a combination of the two, 
which is the usual case. Marine operations are normally planned to be of short 
duration; a coastal objective is seized and defended until regular Army troops 
can arrive to expand the beachhead and conduct extended land warfare. In some 
cases the Marines may be required to remain and participate as ground troops in 
an extended operation. This requires special support arrangements, since the 
Marines are essentially light assault forces and lack the back-up logistical 
organization required for extended operations. 

Task forces for amphibious operations are temporary organizations "tailor- 
made" for each operation from existing organizational units. They vary in size, 
but are normally built around a ground element which may be a battalion (about 
1000 men), a regiment (about 3500 men) or a division (about 17,500 men). The 
amphibious task force, of whatever size, consists of three principal elements: 



21 



the amphibious force (i.e., the ships), the landing force, and the support 
force. The landing force is normally an air/ground team; the helicopters used 
to land the ground troops are part of the landing force and can move their base 
of operations from the ships to airfields ashore. Tactical and service air 
support may also be phased ashore. The third element, the support force, con- 
sists of ships to furnish naval gunfire, aircraft carriers, antisubmarine units, 
minesweeps, etc., and will not be further discussed since none of these ships 
are normally used for casualty receiving and treatment. 



TASK FORCE TERMINOLOGY 

Amphibious Task Unit/Marine Amphibious Unit (ATU/MAU) 

This is the smallest basic force. It consists of 5 to 7 ships (an amphib- 
ious squadron or PHILBRON) , a battalion of ground troops with attachments 
and deletions (battalion landing team or BLT), and 20 to 30 helicopters of 
various sizes (a Provisional Marine Air Group or PROVMAG). The ships comprise 
the Amphibious Task Unit (ATU); the troops and the aircraft are the Marine Am- 
phibious Unit (MAU). (The ATU/MAU has also been known as an "Amphibious Ready 
Group/Special Landing Force" or ARG/SLF. ) Several ATU/MAU 1 s are continuously 
afloat in troubled areas such as the Mediterranean and Western Pacific. Others 
may be formed and deployed intermittently to areas such as the Caribbean and 
Indian Ocean. This task force is designed for small scale combat, protection 
of U.S. Nationals and property in areas of civil unrest, disaster relief opera- 
tions, and similar tasks. One or two medical officers and 40 to 65 corpsmen 
are included in the Marine battalion. In addition, the necessary equipment and 
supplies may be carried to establish a thirty-bed emergency shore hospital and 
in some cases a skeleton crew for this may be carried. A medical officer and 
8 to 10 corpsmen are normally assigned to a helicopter carrier (Amphibious 
Assault Ship — LPH) , normally the principal ship of such a Task Force. If a 
casualty care situation appears likely, a surgical team and surgical support 
team would be assigned to the helicopter carrier to establish a surgical capa- 
bility afloat. Casualties would be evacuated to the ship by helicopter. 

If it becomes desirable to establish a small field hospital ashore a Sur- 
gical Platoon Cadre could be airlifted to the site to use the thirty-bed hos- 
pital ("clearing station") mentioned above. Alternatively, the embarked sur- 
gical team could be used to staff this hospital ashore. Although the capability 
to establish field hospitals of this small size in support of independent 
battalions has existed for many years it has very rarely been employed in combat 
operations. 

Command and control of the operation is initially exercised from the heli- 
copter carrier but may be moved ashore. 

Amphibious Task Group/Marine Amphibious Brigade (ATG/MAB) 

This is the middle-size task force. It is approximately three times as 
large as the ATU/MAU and consists of 15 to 20 ships (an Amphibious Group or 
PHIBRU), a Regimental Landing Team (RLT) of Marines, and about 50 helicopters. 
The communications circuits available on a helicopter carrier are not sufficient 
to control the assault operations of a task force of this size so a special 
ship, the Amphibious Control Ship (LCC), is included in the force. The LCC is 
not normally used as a casualty receiving ship but the Medical Regulating Center 

22 



( 



(MRC) , that controls .casualty distribution to the ships of the task force, 
plus the Amphibious Force Surgeon and the Landing Force Surgeon, are normally 
located aboard the LCC. 

This task force is capable of engaging in combat of greater magnitude and 
intensity than the ATU/MAU and so the proportion of medical support personnel 
is usually increased. In addition to the medical personnel of the regiment and 
air group, a medical company ("Collecting and Clearing" Company) will usually 
be attached. This company is equipped to erect a sixty-bed field surgical 
hospital. The staff consists of corpsmen and Marine personnel from garrison 
forces plus two FMF Surgical Platoon Cadres deployed from naval hospitals. If 
helicopter operations are unopposed and casualties can be returned to the ships 
promptly, the company may not be established ashore. In any event, the doctors 
and corpsmen would normally work in the shipboard operating rooms for the first 
several days of the operation, until sufficient security is established ashore 
to permit field hospital operations. 

In addition to the medical company of the landing force, the ATG Surgeon 
would probably employ three or more surgical teams and an equal number of sur- 
gical support teams to establish a surgical capability on various ships of the 
ATG. The number of ships to be so staffed and designated as "Casualty Receiv- 
ing and Treatment Ships" would depend upon the casualty estimates. Rapid 
provision of additional teams and equipment could be accomplished through further 
use of the augmentation plan. 

Amphibious Task Force/Marine Amphibious Force (ATF/MAF) 

This is the largest regularly organized amphibious task force. The ATF/MAF 
consists of 44 to 55 amphibious ships, a Marine Division (reinforced) of ground 
forces, and a Marine Aircraft Wing. The Wing includes fixed wing aircraft 
squadrons and helicopter squadrons. The Marine Division (reinforced) includes 
about 15,000 assault troops and an almost equal number of support and service 
troops — i.e., artillery, engineers, tanks, medical, supply, etc. Some of these 
troops, and some parts of the air component, would not move ashore until 3 to 5 
days after the initial assault. Medical support essential for a landing force 
this size against a defended objective would normally include a hospital ship 
and surgical and surgical support teams on each of the helicopter carriers and 
on various other ships of the amphibious force. The division ff Medical Bat- 
talion", consisting of a Headquarters and Service Company and four "Collecting 
and Clearing" companies, would provide the equivalent of eight surgical teams 
to staff shipboard surgical - facilities during the assault phase. As secure 
areas were established ashore, these companies would be moved ashore where 
they would be employed individually (to set up sixty-bed surgical hospitals) 
or combined to form larger hospitals. Other field hospital facilities may be 
attached to the MAF if required. 

OPERATIONAL CONCEPTS 

In classic amphibious operations, during the assault phase the landing 
force receives total support from the ships at sea. Initial supplies of all 



23 



sorts are off-loaded in priority sequence. After a beachhead has been secured, 
general unloading commences and all supplies are unloaded as rapidly as possible 
and delivered to dumps ashore. Individual combat units draw from these dumps. 

During the early phases of the assault little more than first aid from 
Navy doctors and corpsmen attached to the Marine units is available ashore. 
Casualties sustained during the first two or three days of the operation are 
furnished definitive care aboard ship. Field surgical facilities are moved 
ashore as soon as the tactical situation permits and initial definitive treat- 
ment is gradually phased ashore. However, it should be remembered that Marine 
organizations do not have sufficient medical assets to become totally self- 
sufficient. Supplemental medical /surgical support from the fleet or other 
attached medical facilities such as advance base hospitals is explicitly assumed. 

Command and control of the landing force moves ashore as soon as the troop 
commander feels he can more effectively control the landing force from there 
and when sufficient personnel, equipment, and supplies have been established 
ashore to accomplish this. 

New concepts of amphibious warfare including the Seaborne Mobile Logistics 
Concept and the Sea-basing Concept of operation are currently being tested and 
evaluated for task forces of ATU/MAU and ATG/MAB size. These concepts are pos- 
sible due to the increasing availability and effectiveness of helicopters, the 
communications system, and the anticipated combat environment in which they 
will be employed. Tests of these concepts in operational exercises of various 
sizes will become increasingly frequent. Both concepts contain the provision 
that the ability be maintained to move command/control, and service support 
ashore, if required. The same is true of medical support. All definitive care 
will normally be provided aboard ship; however , the medical personnel and equip- 
ment of the landing force must be capable of displacement ashore if necessary. 
A general description of the two concepts follow. 

The Seaborne Mobile Logistics Concept provides that all logistic functions 
(supply, maintenance, medical, etc.) will remain afloat during amphibious war- 
fare operation. Other headquarters functions, including command and control 
organizations phase ashore. Supply dumps are not established ashore. Unit re- 
supply is made by helicopter directly from the ships of the task force. In 
this concept all patients requiring definitive medical treatment are returned 
to the ships. 

The Sea-Basing Concept provides that both logistic support and the landing 
force headquarters staff (command and control) remain afloat. The operation 
is totally controlled and supplied from afloat. 

SHIPS OF THE AMPHIBIOUS FORCES 

The Amphibious Forces of the U.S. Fleet consist of about 80 ships. They 
are new, fast (20 knots plus), and all have helicopter landing platforms. The 
following ships are representative examples of the principal amphibious types. 
For detailed medical space plans and other information see "Medical Capability 
and Inventory of the Ships of the Amphibious Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet". 



24 










(Artist's Concept) 

LHA AMPHIBIOUS ASSAULT SHIP, GENERAL PURPOSE 

(five under construction, 1972) 



The LHA is a large ship which externally resembles an aircraft carrier. 
The LHA can transport most of the elements of a Marine Amphibious Unit (i.e. 
about 1500 assault troops) plus the helicopters, boats, and amphibious vehicles 
required to land them by air or sea. 

Its designed medical spaces are large and include four major and two minor 
operating rooms, sixty primary hospital beds (including an intensive care area) 
and a 240-bed, specially-configured overflow ward. 

Dental spaces include one oral surgery operating room, two general dental 
operating, rooms, and supportive diagnostic, patient management, and treatment 
facilities. 



25 




( 



LPH AMPHIBIOUS ASSAULT SHIP 



The LPH is also a large ship and is designed to combat-load, transport, 
and land a Battalion Landing Team (BLT) and a transport helicopter squadron 
with their essential air transportable equipment and supplies. To accomplish 
this it uses the embarked assault transport helicopters of the landing force. 
If the force is to be landed by surface, boats and amphibious vehicles are 
provided from other ships of the Task Force. 

Medical spaces of the LPH consist of two or three surgical operating rooms, 
two dental operating rooms and supporting casualty care facilities. The dental 
spaces provide operating rooms for oral/maxillof acial surgery as well as for 
emergency dental care in general. 

Diagrams of typical LPH medical spaces and the principal items of equip- 
ment which they contain may be found in "Medical Capability Survey and Inventory 
of the Ships of the Amphibious Force, U. S. Atlantic Fleet." Copies of this 
document are available in the library of each of the naval hospitals. 



26 










LPD AMPHIBIOUS TRANSPORT, DOCK 



The LPD is used to embark, transport, and load elements of a landing force 
and essential equipment and supplies by means of embarked landing craft or 
amphibious vehicles, augmented by a limited helicopter lift. 

The LPD is characterized by a well deck which can be flooded and a stern 
gate so that landing craft can dock within the ship itself. This greatly facil- 
itates loading operations. The LPD can carry 900 to 1000 troops. 

Its current (1972) medical spaces are not considered adequate to allow the 
ship to support a surgical team. Proposals to modify and expand the medical/ 
dental facilities are under consideration. 



27 




( 



LSD DOCK LANDING SHIP 



Although called a "landing ship" the LSD does not beach. The LSD is similar 
to the LPD except that its well deck is larger with greater capacity, thereby 
diminishing its troop- and cargo-carrying capability. 

The main function of the LSD is to serve as "mother ship" for landing 
craft and amphibious vehicles. It transports them to the combat area and re- 
pairs and maintains them during the operation. 

The newer LSD's (LSD 36 et seq.) have much larger medical spaces than the 
older LSD's and could probably support a surgical team and serve as secondary 
casualty receiving and treatment ships. Studies are being conducted of the 
feasibility of using this type ship as a platform for a field hospital. 



<J 



28 




LKA AMPHIBIOUS CARGO SHIP 



The LKA is used to transport supplies and equipment plus a limited number 
of troops to the objective area. 

The newer LKA* s have a helicopter platform but most supplies and equipment 
they carry is moved ashore by landing craft belonging to the ship. 

Newer ships (LKA- 113 class) have medical spaces which include two surgical 
operating rooms. These ships have considerable potential to serve as casualty 
receiving ships and there is an active program to accomplish certain ship 
alterations to realize this potential. 



29 




LST TANK LANDING SHIP 



LST's vary significantly depending upon the class of ship. The earlier 
LST's have "clam shell" bows which open and allow unloading of vehicles and 
supplies directly onto a beach. The newer LST's (LST 1179 class) are fast ships 
with much deeper draft and cannot be beached as close to the waterline as the 
older ones. They have a bow ramp (in lieu of the clam shell bow) that is placed 
ashore or on a pontoon causeway carried by the ship. 

Medical facilities on all LST's regardless of class, are very limited; 
however, the large tank deck (the deck on which armored vehicles (tanks) and 
trucks are carried) is suited for use as space for establishing casualty care 
facilities. Use of LST space in this manner provides a highly mobile facility 
with good protection from small arms fire, low velocity fragments, and inclement 
weather. The practice was widely employed in World War II amphibious operations. 

The newer LST's are capable of receiving casualties by boat (they have a 
stern gate), helicopter, or directly from shore via ambulance or hand carry 
when the bow ramp is extended. 



30 







LPA AMPHIBIOUS TRANSPORT 



There are only a few LPA's remaining in the Fleet and they are being rapidly 
phased out. 

The LPA has the medical facilities to function as a casualty receiving 
ship, but helicopter landing capability is marginal and night helicopter opera- 
tions are hazardous and not normally permitted. 

Dental care facilities are available. 



31 



r 




, • - 



•■-~< v-' — -w.. 




LCC AMPHIBIOUS COMMAND SHIP 



The LCC is a large ship especially equipped for control of amphibious land- 
ings, including medical control of patient movement, etc. 

Although it possesses excellent medical and dental facilities, its tactical 
commitment will not normally allow it to function as a casualty receiving ship. 
However, it does serve as the medical nerve center of an amphibious operation. 

The senior medical officers of the Task Force and the Landing Force and 
their staffs coordinate all medical activities from this ship. The central 
medical regulating office (casualty movement control) is also located aboard 
the LCC. 



32 



THE FLEET MARINE FORCE 
The Marine Division 

A Marine Division consists of three infantry regiments, (each consisting 
of three infantry battalions) an artillery regiment and seven separate bat- 
talions (see the following chart). Its approximate strength is 17,500 men in- 
cluding medical personnel. Medical personnel of the division are under the 
direct command of the unit to which they are assigned. The following chart, 
"Organization of the Marine Division," presents the individual subordinate 
organizations, their approximate strength, and the number of officer and en- 
listed medical personnel included in each organization. 

The Marine Division is commanded by a Major General. He is assisted in 
various specialized functions by his special staff. The medical special staff 
officer is the Division Surgeon. The Division Surgeon is assisted by a Medical 
Service Corps officer and five enlisted personnel. His assigned task is to 
advise the Division Commander regarding medical matters within the Division. 

A similar special staff function is served by the commanding officer of 
the Dental Company (a Force Troops uni t normally assigned to support a division). 
In his capacity as Division Dental officer, the Dental Company commander advises 
the division commander concerning dental matters within the division. 

In general, the regiments and battalions of the division are medically 
supported by aid stations located near their respective unit's command post. 
The one exception is the medical battalion. It is composed of five companies: 
a headquarters company and four "Collecting and Clearing" companies. The head- 
quarters company has a medical records section, a preventive medicine section, 
and two shock and surgical teams. 

The "Collecting and Clearing" company is composed of seven medical officers, 
one medical service corps officer, 4 nurse corps officers (male), a chaplain, 
60 hospital corpsmen, and 25 Marines. The company is divided into three 
platoons — one "Collecting" and two "Clearing" or "Surgical" platoons. 

The two "Clearing" platoons, when combined, can establish a basic, highly- 
mobile, sixty-bed field surgical hospital or clearing station. "Collecting and 
Clearing" companies may be individually assigned in direct support of regimental 
landing teams or may be combined to form larger field hospital units in general 
support of the combat force. 

Oral surgical and dental support is provided to regiments and battalions 
by the Dental Company of Force Troops which consists of 24 dental off icers> one 
Medical Service Corps Officer and 42 dental technicians. The company is organ- 
ized into an H&S platoon, a mobile dental clinic section, a clinic platoon, and 
a prosthetic platoon. 



33 



MARINE DIVISION * 
APPROXIMATELY 17,500 MEN 


MEDICAL 
OFF 
108 


ENL 

1074 



r 



INFANTRY- 
REGIMENT ** 
APPROX. 3500 MEN 



MEDICAL 
OFF ENL 
7 198 



-| 



SHORE PARTY 

BATTALION 

APPROX. 300 MEN 



MEDICAL 

OFF ENL 

3 42 



HEADQUARTERS 
BATTALION 
APPROX. 1200 MEN 



MEDICAL 

OFF ENL 

3 22 



ARTILLERY 
REGIMENT 
APPROX. 2400 MEN 



MEDICAL 

OFF ENL 

5 48 



RECONNAISSANCE 

BATTALION 
APPROX. 500 MEN 



MEDICAL 

OFF ENL 

1 31 



MEDICAL 

BATTALION 
APPROX. 550 MEN 



MEDICAL 

OFF ENL 

69 294 



SERVICE 

BATTALION 

APPROX. 1100 MEN 



MEDICAL 

OFF ENL 

4 26 



ENGINEER 

BATTALION 

APPROX. 800 MEN 



MEDICAL 

OFF ENL 

1 12 



MOTOR TRANSPORT 

BATTALION 
APPROX. 300 MEN 



MEDICAL 
OFF ENL 

1 5 



* Unit strength is approximate total strength (including medical personnel) 
and is subject to frequent minor fluctuations. 
** There are three infantry regiments of equal size in a Marine Division. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE MARINE DIVISION 



34 



Force Troops 

"Force troops 1 * comprise a number of support organizations which are not 
normally part of the division organization, but which can be attached from 
higher FMF headquarters as required. Each force troops unit has its own inte- 
gral (but limited) medical capability in much the same manner as the division 
units. Force troops elements include medical support units. In 1972 these 
were: 

Force Hospital Company 

A Force Hospital Company is a separate Fleet Marine Force unit which may 
be attached to a force, division, or other large task group. Its mission is 
to provide resuscitation and primary definitive surgical facilities, including 
facilities for the establishment of a 100-bed hospital for the relatively minor 
wounded, sick and injured, and the evacuation of those casualties requiring pro- 
longed hospitalization. 

Separate Surgical Company 

A Separate Surgical Company is a Fleet Marine Force unit which may be 
attached to a large force for amphibious operations. Its mission is to provide 
highly specialized surgical facilities within a Fleet Marine Force. It has 
facilities for the establishment of a 400-bed, semimobile hospital equipped to 
handle casualties requiring special surgery. All casualties requiring such 
surgery are routed to it from medical companies. Upon discharge, casualties 
are returned to their units, or are entered in the normal chain of evacuation. 

Dental Company 

The force dental company provides dental support to a Marine division, 
aircraft wing, force troops, or groupings of FMF units of equivalent size. It 
may function either as a unit or in combination with other dental companies 
to mass appropriate dental support within a geographic area or military command. 

The Marine Aircraft Wing 

The Marine Air Wing consists of several groups which are often sited in- 
dependently. Marine fixed-wing air groups have the capability to establish 
twenty-bed basic medical /surgical facilities, as does the Headquarters Group. 
Helicopter Groups do not have a surgical capability. 

Future Developments 

As a result of several years of study, there are now recommendations under 
consideration which, if adopted, will substantially change the organization of 
medical support to the Fleet Marine Force. It is proposed to use physician's 
assistants rather than physicians at battalion level. The Medical Battalion 
would become a Force Troops organization, serving the entire MAF (Marine Amphib- 
ious Force) rather than a Division organization. Wing surgical assets would 
be merged with the MAF Medical Battalion. The Force Hospital Company would be- 
come a full-service, 200-to-250-bed field hospital and the separate surgical 
company would be eliminated. The Dental Company would be retained as a Force 
Troops element. 



35 



PREPARATION FOR AUGMENTATION ASSIGNMENT 

TEAM PREPARATION 

Professional — Each team must take every available opportunity to develop 
unity and efficiency of the team; this can be done through coordinated effort 
in actual procedures in hospital assignments or in the simulated combat or 
disaster environment of medical exercises. The degree to which teamwork is 
developed in daily routines will be directly reflected in the efficiency of the 
team when it is deployed. 

Administrative--In addition to the professional medical duties "of the team 
members (especially the of f icer-in-charge) , numerous administrative tasks must 
be accomplished. These tasks reflect directly upon the professional capability 
of the team and the efficiency of its operation. To simplify or expedite the 
accomplishment of various administrative tasks, several check lists have been 
developed and are provided as Appendices A through F. These check lists are 
designed to specif ically identify team members, ensure team compliance with all 
current directives, and when all items listed are complied with, to ensure the 
team's ability to rapidly respond to a deployment directive. 

Team check lists are presented for: 

Appendix Title 

A Surgical Team (Semiannual Pre-alert Check List) 

B Surgical Team (Mount-out Check List) 

C Surgical Support Team (Semiannual Pre-alert Check List) 

D Surgical Support Team (Mount -out Check List) 

E FMF Surgical Platoon Cadre (Semiannual Pre-alert Check List) 

F FMF Surgical Platoon Cadre (Mount-out Check List) 

NOTE: It is recommended that similar check lists be developed for special 
teams which may be designated. 

INDIVIDUAL AUGMENTEE PREPARATION 

The individual augmentee assignment presents a most challenging experience 
to medical personnel. With little notice, augmentees are deployed from their 
familiar surroundings. They are assigned to a new environment to perform new 
but related duties under the cognizance of a new supervisor or, in some cases, 
to perform their assigned duties with little supervision, totally independent 
of professional medical supervision. 

In order to function effectively under these conditions personnel must 
possess versatility and adaptability. They must be proficient both in their 
specialties and knowledgeable of the environment in which they will work. The 
best indicators of potential assignment are Grade/Rank and specialty. Using 
these as guides the individual augmentee can reasonably predict the type of 



36 



r 



( 









assignment he will receive; thus Junior MO's with partial or no specialty 
training are likely to be assigned as battalion medical officers or ships medi- 
cal officers. Board eligible or certified surgical, anesthesia specialists 
are likely to be assigned to field hospitals. 

Most individual augmentees are assigned to the FMF. Such individuals 
should familiarize themselves with FMFM 4-5, Medical and Dental Support, U.S. 
Marine Corps. 

To assist in the preparation of individual augmentees for deployment, 
individual augmentee check lists have been produced and are presented in Ap- 
pendices G through J as follows: 

Appendix Title 

G Sponsor's Individual Augmentee (Semiannual Pre-alert Check List) 

H Sponsor's Individual Augmentee (Mount-out Check List) 

I Individual Augmentee (Semiannual Pre-alert Check List) 

J Individual Augmentee (Mount-out Check List) 



37 



c 



( 



APPENDIX A 



Year -1 -2 
Halves (circle) 



SURGICAL TEAM 
Semiannual Pre-alert Check List 



(To be completed by surgical team senior member) 



PERSONNEL 






List of 


Male Personnel Assigned: (fill in) 




NOTE 
# or * 


RANK/ 
GRADE 


NAME 


SPECIALTY 
CODE 


DUTY 








NOBC 0214 


general surgeon 








NOBC 0244 


orthopedic surgeon 








NOBC 0613 


anesthesiologist 








NOBC 0910 


anesthetist (NC) 








NOBC 0970 


operating room nurse 






- 


NOBC 0802 


administrative officer 
(MSC) 








HM-0000 


general service 
hospital corpsman 








HM-8417 


clinical laboratory 
technician 








HM-8442 


medical administrative 
technician (HMC) 








HM-8452 


medical x-ray 

technician (HMC or 
HMD 








HM-8483 


operating room 

technician (primary 
NEC) 








HM-8483 


ti 








HM-8483 


it 








HM-8483 


operating room tech- 
nician (primary or 
secondary NEC) 








HM-8483 


u 








HM-8489 


orthopedic cast room 
technician 



Footnote to List of Personnel Assigned 

# Senior member of team. 

* Member having FMF experience. or Field Medical Service School attendance. 



A-l 



PERSONNEL (continued) 

1 All personnel designated as team members have been notified in writing. 

] All personnel designated as team members have received surgical team 
briefing. 

] All individuals assigned as team members have been immunized in accordance 
with BUMEDINST 6230.1 series for alert forces. 

1 No individual assigned as a team member has a concurrent assignment for 
individual augmentee duty nor has his immediate availability been com- 
promised in any way. 

] Each individual assigned as a team member is receiving adequate and con- 
tinued training to meet disaster and/or combat readiness criteria. 

Each sponsored surgical team has participated in a team exercise: 

|~| Locally Q In the field [_J Aboard ships . 

] Training of the surgical team(s) has been conducted (through lectures, 
audio-visual aids, films, etc.) with emphasis on traumatic surgery. 

1 Training of the surgical team(s) has been conducted to provide surgical 
care under shipboard and field conditions. 

] The surgical team(s) has been instructed regarding "Medical Capability 
Survey and Inventory of the Ships of the Amphibious Force, U.S. Atlantic 
Fleet," October 1970. 

] Each individual assigned as a team member has received and has been en- 
couraged to use reference materials, correspondence courses, and train- 
ing films that are available for his study and which are relative to 
his training for augmentation duty. i 

Each individual assigned as a team member has access to and is familiar 
with the following publications (provided by BUMED to sponsoring hos- 
pitals): 

- CINCPAC Conferences on War Surgery, Volumes 1 through 5 

- Combat and Field Medicine Practice, BUPERS 10817(_) series 

- FMFM 4-5 Medical and Dental Support USMC (particularly required for 

teams 4, 10, 15, and 19) 

- Medical Capability Survey and Inventory of the Ships of the Amphib- 

ious Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, October 1970 (and companion 
PACFLT Volume when available) 

- NATO Handbook for War Surgery 

The following records, cards, and tags pertaining to each assigned member 
of the surgical team(s) have been brought to a current status: 

Official Passport (certain teams only) 

Health Record — has been verified and is current with regard to all 
required immunizations. Immunization Card DD Form 737 is held by 
each person. (See current BUMEDINST 6230.1 series re: Immuni- 
zation Requirements and Procedures.) 

Dental Record — the Standard Form 103 is up-to-date (valuable means 
of identification). (BUMED Man. 6-107-8.) 



A- 2 



_ Service Record — the record of emergency data, NAVPERS 1070/602, 
November 1969, is up-to-date. 

Pay Record — allotments have been registered to cover insurance, 
~ bonds, dependents, etc., and have been forwarded to the Navy Finance 
Center. 

_ Identification Tags— (BUPERS Man. 4610150.) 

Identification Card~DD Form 2N Active, is current. (BUPERS Man. 
4620150.) 

_ Geneva Convention I. D. Card— DD Form 528 (BUPERS Man. 4620100) is 
immediately available for each person. 

Secret security clearances have been obtained or requested for all 
senior medical personnel. 

All individuals assigned to surgical teams have been advised to: 

Check insurance policies and determine that amounts are adequate 
and beneficiaries are correctly designated. 

Make certain that allotments are registered to cover all financial 
obligations, BUPERS Man. 6210120, and to provide the family with 
money while away. 

Check with station legal officer relative to: 

A valid last will and testament , e.g., proper number of witness 
signatures according to requirements of various states, etc. 

Power-of -attorney. 

Joint bank account (with wife or next of kin). 

Co-ownership of personal property, such as car, stocks, bonds, 
real estate, etc. 

Memo to next of kin regarding location of property or special 
instruments, such as insurance policies, safety boxes, tax 
receipts, deeds, etc. 

Any other personal legal problems. 

Assure that a ready supply of cash will be available. Delays in 
drawing pay under emergency situations are frequent. 

^ All individuals assigned to surgical teams are in a physically fit status 
for deployment. 

] All individuals assigned to surgical teams possess and maintain their re- 
quired quantity of uniforms and accessories in readiness for deployment. 

SURGICAL SUPPLY BLOCK 

~\ All surgical material is packed and sterilized in accordance with instruc- 
tions in BUMED AMAL 635. 

] Consideration was given to local tailoring of assigned supply blocks to 
accommodate specialized techniques or training of team personnel. 

] All assigned supply blocks have been updated to conform with latest re- 
vised allowance list received from Field Branch, BUMED. 



A- 3 



[ ] Sterility tests of prepackaged sterile surgical packs were conducted during 
last _ February, August. 

|~| Within 30 days preceding the report date 1 March, 1 September, 

familiarization procedures with contents and functional packing concepts 
of the surgical team supply block material were conducted. Reference: 
BUMESINST 6440.1 series, paragraph 7h. 

] Material was restored to a condition of readiness for immediate deployment 
and use. 

] Report was submitted by the Command to BUMED on material readiness of each 
surgical block under cognizance: 1 March; 1 September. 

|~~1 Copy of material readiness report was submitted to Field Branch, 

BUMED 

3500 South Broad Street 1 March; 1 September 

Philadelphia, Pa. 19145 

ORDERS /TRANSPORTATION 

] Orders are prepared and are on file for transportation of each team member 
to destination when ordered to be deployed. Destination and reporting 
instructions are to be completed when the team is deployed. Security 
certification is included as appropriate. 

] Transportation means and procedure for shipment of the surgical team supply 
block to various locations has been identified. 

For Surgical Teams 4, 10, 15, and 19 

1 An FMF Surgical Platoon Cadre, Semiannual Pre-alert Check List has been 

completed (see Appendix E. ) /" 



A-4 



APPENDIX B 



SURGICAL TEAM 
Mount-out Check List 

(To be completed by surgical team senior member) 



PERSONNEL 



List of 


Personnel assigned: (fill in) 






NOTE 
# or * 


RANK/ 
GRADE 


NAME 


SPECIALTY 
CODE 


DUTY 








NOBC 0214 


general surgeon 








NOBC 0244 


orthopedic surgeon 








NOBC 0613 


anesthesiologist 








NOBC 0910 


anesthetist (NC) 








NOBC 0970 


operating room nurse 








NOBC 0802 


administrative officer 
(MSC) 








HM-0000 


general service 
hospital corpsman 








HM-8417 


clinical laboratory 
technician 








HM-8442 


medical administrative 
technician (HMC) 








HM-8452 


medical x-ray tech- 
nician (HMC or HMI) 








HM-8483 


operating room tech- 
nician (primary NEC) 








HM-8483 


it 








HM-8483 


tt 








HM-8483 


operating room tech- 
nician (primary or 
secondary NEC) 








HM-8483 


ii 








HM-8489 


orthopedic cast room 
technician 



Footnote to List of Personnel Assigned 

# Senior member of team. 

* Member having FMF experience or Field Medical Service School attendance. 



B-l 



PERSONNEL (Continued) 

] All team members have been notified (individually) regarding their alert 
status and regarding changes in the alert status. 

] All individual team members are in a physically fit status for deployment. 

The following records, cards, and tags pertaining to each assigned member 
of the surgical team(s) have been brought to a current status: 

Official Passport (certain teams only) 

Health Record — has been verified and is current with regard to all 
" required immunizations. Immunication Card DD Form 737 is held by 
each person. (See current BUMEDINST 6230.1 series re: Immuni- 
zation Requirements and Procedures.) 

Dental Record — the Standard Form 103 is up-to-date (valuable means 
of identification). (BUMED Man. 6-107-8.) 

Service Record — the record of emergency data, NAVPERS 1070/602, 
November 1969, is up-to-date. 

Pay Record — allotments have been registered to cover insurance, 
" bonds, dependents, etc., and have been forwarded to the Navy Finance 
Center. 

Identification Tags— (BUPERS Man. 4610150.) 

Identification Card — DD Form 2N Active, is current. (BUPERS Man. 
4620150.) 

_ Geneva Convention I. D. Card— DD Form 528 (BUPERS Man. 4620100) is 
immediately available for each person. 

Secret security clearances have been obtained or requested for all 
senior medical personnel. 

] Each individual team member possesses and maintains his required quantity 
of uniforms and accessories in readiness for deployment. 

I I TAD orders are issued to each individual team member in accordance with 
BUPERSINST 5400.42 series and NAVPERS 15909 (_) series, Navy Enlisted 
Transfer Manual. 

] Individual team members have been directed to report to their appropriate 
commander or of f icer-in-charge at their destination for additional TAD 
augmentation assignment. 

1 Deployment travel of individual team members has been certified for Class 
I priority travel in government aircraft. If no government aircraft was 
available, travel by commercial air has been certified. 

1 The commander requesting the surgical team has been alerted regarding 
transportation requirements. 

1 Station to departure point and interim transportation transfer has been 
arranged. 

] Plans have been developed for arrival at the destination including report- 
ing and a preliminary plan of operation. 



B-2 






SURGICAL SUPPLY BLOCK . 

I~) Perishable and deteriorable items have been prepared and included in the 
surgical supply block. 

□ The surgical supply block has been prepared and staged (if required) for 

quick departure. 

Q Arrangements have been made for material handling equipment (as required) 
such as fork lifts, dollys, etc. 

□ A confirmation report on material readiness of the team supply block was 

submitted to BUMED. 

TRANSPORTATION ; 

LJ The transportation agency (for personnel and for supply block) has been 
alerted. 

[J Transportation from duty station to departure point and interim trans- 
portation has been arranged. 



B-3 



( 



c 






Year -1 -2 
Halves (circle) 



APPENDIX C 



SURGICAL SUPPORT TEAM 
Semiannual P re-alert Check List 



(To be completed by sponsoring activity) 






PERSONNEL 



List of 


Male Personnel Assigned: 


(fill in) 




NOTE 
# or * 


RANK/ 
GRADE 


NAME 


SPECIALTY 
CODE 


DUTY 










NOBC 0070 


general medical 
officer 










NOBC 0945 


nurse 










HM-0000 


general service 
hospital corpsman 










HM-GO00 












HM-0000 












HM-0000 












HM-0000 












HM-0000 












HM-0000 












HM-0000 












HM-0000 












HM-0000 





Footnote to List of Personnel Assigned 

# Senior member of team. 

* Member having FMF experience or Field Medical Service School attendance. 






C-l 



PERSONNEL (continued) 

] All individuals assigned as team members have been notified in writing. 

] All individuals assigned as team members have received a surgical support 
team briefing. 

] All individuals assigned as team members have been immunized in accordance 
with BUMEDINST 6230.1 series for alert forces. 

] No medical officer assigned as a team member will have his residency train- 
ing interrupted (desirable). 

^} No individual assigned as a team member has a concurrent assignment for 
individual augment ee duty nor has his immediate availability been com- 
promised in any way. 

] Each individual assigned as a team member is receiving adequate and contin- 
ued training to meet disaster and /or combat readiness criteria. 

Each sponsored surgical support team has participated in a team exercise: 

□ Locally Q In the field Q] Aboard ships 

] Training of the surgical support team(s) has been conducted (through lec- 
tures, audio-visual aids, films, etc.) with emphasis on traumatic sur- 
gery. 

1 Training of the surgical support team(s) has been conducted to provide sur- 
gical support care under shipboard and field conditions. 

] The surgical support team(s) has been instructed regarding "Medical Capa- 
bility Survey and Inventory of the Ships of the Amphibious Force, U.S. 
Atlantic Fleet," October 1970. 

] Each individual assigned as a team member has received and has been en- 
couraged to use reference materials, correspondence courses and. train- 
ing films that are available for his study and which are relative to 
his training for augmentation duty. 

Each individual assigned as a team member has access to and is familiar 
with the following publications (provided by BUMED to sponsoring hos- 
pitals) : 

- CINCPAC Conferences on War Surgery, Volumes 1 through 5 

- Combat and Field Medicine Practice, BUPERS 10817(_) series 

- FMFM 4-5 Medical and Dental Support USMC (particularly required for 

teams 4, 10, 15, and 19) 

- Medical Capability Survey and Inventory of the Ships of the Amphib- 

ious Force, U. S. Atlantic Fleet, October 1970 (and companion 
PACFLT Volume when available) 

- NATO Handbook for War Surgery 

The following records, cards, and tags pertaining to each assigned member 
of the surgical team(s) have been brought to a current status: 

Official Passport (certain teams only) 

Health Record — has been verified and is current with regard to all 
" required immunizations. Immunization Card DD Form 737 is held by 
each person. (See current BUMEDINST 6230.1 series re: Immuni- 
zation Requirements and Procedures. ) 



C-2 



C 






Dental Record — the Standard Form 103 is up-to-date (valuable means 
"of identification). (BUMED Man. 6-107-8.) 

Service Record — the record of emergency data, NAVPERS 1070/602, 
November 1969, is up-to-date. 

Pay Record — allotments have been registered to cover insurance, 
bonds, dependents, etc., and have been forwarded to the Navy Finance 
Center. 

Identification Tags--(BUPERS Man. 4610150.) 

Identification Card — DD Form 2N Active, is current. (BUPERS Man. 
4620150. ) 

_ Geneva Convention I. D. Card— DD Form 528 (BUPERS Man. 4620100) is 
immediately available for each person. 

Secret security clearances have been obtained or requested for all 
senior medical personnel. 

All individuals assigned to surgical support teams have been advised to: 

Check insurance policies and determine that amounts are adequate 
and beneficiaries are correctly designated. 

Make certain that allotments are registered to cover all financial 
" obligations, BUPERS Man. 6210120, and to provide the family with 
money while away. 

Check with station legal officer relative to: 

A valid last will and testament, e.g., proper number of witness 
signatures according to requirements of various states, etc. 

Power-of -attorney. 

Joint bank account (with wife or next of kin). 

Co-ownership of personal property, such as car, stocks, bonds, 
real estate, etc. 

Memo to next of kin regarding location of property or special 
instruments, such as insurance policies, safety boxes, tax 
receipts, deeds, etc. 

Any other personal legal problems. 

Assure that a ready supply of cash will be available. Delays in 
drawing pay under emergency situations are frequent. 

i 

] All individuals assigned to surgical teams are in a physically fit status 
for deployment. 

1 All individuals assigned to surgical teams possess and maintain their re- 
quired quantity of uniforms and accessories in readiness for deployment. 

ORDERS / TRANS PORTAI ION 

] Orders are prepared and are on file for each team member so that delay in 
deployment will be minimized. 



C-3 



APPENDIX D 



SURGICAL SUPPORT TEAM 
Mount-out Check List 

(To be completed by surgical support team senior member) 



PERSONNEL 



List of 


Male P 


ar sonne 1 Assigned: 


(fill in) 




NOTE 
# or * 


RANK/ 
GRADE 


NAME 


SPECIALTY 
CODE 


DUTY 










NOBC 0070 


general medical 
officer 










NOBC 0945 


nurse 










HM-0000 


general service 
hospital corpsman 










HM-0000 












HM-0000 












HM-0000 












HM-0000 












HM-0000 












HM-0000 












HM-0000 












HM-0000 












HM-0000 





Footnote to List of Personnel Assigned 

# Senior member of team 

* Member having FMF experience or Field Medical Service School attendance. 



D-l 



PERSONNEL (continued) 

Q All team members have been notified (individually) regarding their alert 
status and regarding changes in the alert status. 

n Al l individual team members are in a physically fit status for deployment. 

The following records, cards, and tags pertaining to each assigned member 
of the surgical team(s) have been brought to a current status: 

_ Official Passport (certain teams only) 

_ Health Record — has been verified and is current with regard to all 
required immunizations. Immunization Card DD Form 737 is held by 
each person. (See current BUMEDINST 6230.1 series re: Immuni- 
zation Requirements and Procedures. ) 

_ Dental Record — the Standard Form 103 is up-to-date (valuable means 
of identification). (BUMED Man. 6-107-8.) 

_ Service Record— the record of emergency data, NAVPERS 1070/602, 
November 1969, is up-to-date. 

_ Pay Record--allotments have been registered to cover insurance, 
bonds, dependents, etc., and have been forwarded to the Navy Finance 
Center. 

_ Identification Tags--(BUPERS Man. 4510150.) 

_ Identification Card — DD Form 2N Active, is current. (BUPERS Man. 
" 4620150.) 

_ Geneva Convention I. D. Card— DD Form 528 (BUPERS Man. 4620100) is 
immediately available for each person. 

_ Secret security clearances have been obtained or requested for all 
senior medical personnel. 

1 I Each individual team member possesses and maintains his required quantity 

of uniforms and accessories in readiness for deployment. 

I I TAD orders are issued to each individual team member in accordance with 
BUPERSINST 5400.42 series and NAVPERS 15909(_) series, Navy Enlisted 
Transfer Manual. 

I) Individual team members have been directed to report to their appropriate 
commander or of f icer-in-charge at their destination for additional TAD 
augmentation assignment. 

I! Deployment travel of individual team members has been certified for Class 
I priority travel in government aircraft. If no government aircraft was 
available, travel by commercial air has been certified. 

n The commander requesting the surgical team has been alerted regarding 
transportation requirements. 

I"~l Station to departure point and interim transportation transfer has been 
arranged. 

Q Plans have been developed for arrival at the destination including report- 
ing and a preliminary plan of operation. 



r 



( 



D-2 



APPENDIX E 



Year -1 -2 
Halves (circle) 



FMF SURGICAL PLATOON CADRE 
Semiannual Pre-alert Check List 

(To be completed by sponsoring activity) 

NOTE: Surgical team numbers 4, 10, 15, and 19 are dual-purpose teams and each 
may be deployed as a surgical team or as an FMF Surgical Platoon Cadre. Conse- 
quently, all members, except the two augmented members required exclusively for 
the cadre, must be trained and qualified for the functions of both team and 
cadre 

PERSONNEL 



List of Male Personnel Assigned (fill in) 






NOTE 

# or * 


RANK/ 
GRADE 


NAME 


SPECIALTY 
CODE 


DUTY 








NOBC 0214 


general surgeon 








NOBC 0244 


orthopedic surgeon 








NOBC 0613 


anesthesiologist 








NOBC 0910 


anesthetist (NC) 








NOBC 0970 


operating room nurse 








NOBC 0802 


administrative officer 
(MSC) 








HM-0000 


general service 
hospital corpsman 








HM-8417 


clinical laboratory 
technician 








HM-8442 


medical administrative 
technician (HMC) 








HM-8452 


medical x-ray techn- 
ician (HMC or HMI) 








HM'-8483 


operating room 

technician (primary 
NEC) 








HM-8483 


ir 








HM-8483 


it 



E-l 



PERSONNEL (Continued) 



NOTE 


RANK/ 




SPECIALTY 




# or * 


GRADE 


NAME 


CODE 


DUTY 








HM-8483 


operating room tech- 
nician (primary or 
secondary NEC) 








HM-8483 


ii 








HM-8483 


- ii 








HM-8489 


orthopedic cast room 
technician 




. 




HM-8482 


pharmacy technician 



Footnote to List of Personnel Assigned 

# Senior member of team. 

* Member having FMF experience or Field Medical Service School attendance. 

1 All individuals assigned as cadre members have been notified in writing. 

] All individuals assigned as cadre members have received an FMF Surgical 
Platoon Cadre briefing. 

"1 All individuals assigned as cadre members have been immunized in accor- 
dance with BUMEDINST 6230.1 series for alert forces. 

1 No medical officer assigned as a cadre member will have his residency 
training interrupted (desirable). 

] No individual assigned as a cadre member has a concurrent assignment for 
individual augmentee duty nor has his immediate availability been com- 
promised in any way. 

] Each individual assigned as a cadre member is receiving adequate and con- 
tinued training to meet disaster and/or combat readiness criteria. 

Each sponsored FMF Surgical Platoon Cadre has participated in a team ex- 
ercise: 

] Locally Q In the field Q Aboard ships 

] Training of the FMF Surgical Platoon Cadre has been conducted through lec- 
tures, audio-visual aids, films, etc. , with emphasis on traumatic surgery. 

] Training of the FMF Surgical Platoon Cadre has been conducted to provide 
surgical care under field conditions. 

] Each individual assigned as a team member has received and has been en- 
couraged to use lists of reference materials, correspondence courses, 
and training films that are available for his study and which are rela- 
tive to his training for augmentation duty. 

] Each individual assigned as a cadre member has access to and is familiar 
with the following publications (provided by BUMED to sponsoring hos- 
pitals) : 



L 



E-2 



- CINCPAC Conferences on War Surgery, Volumes 1 through 5 

- Combat and Field Medicine Practice, BUPERS 10817(_) series 

- FMFM 4-5 Medical and Dental support USMC (particularly required for 

teams 4, 10, 15, and 19) 

- Medical Capability Survey and Inventory of the Ships of the Amphib- 

ious Force, U. S- Atlantic Fleet, October 1970 (and companion 
PACFLT Volume when available) 

- NATO Handbook for War Surgery 

I I All cadre members without previous FMF experience have been nominated to 
receive an indoctrination course at a Field Medical Service School. 

] A field exercise of the FMF Surgical Platoon Cadre has been conducted 
during the last 12 months with the Division or Brigade Surgeon of the 
local garrison forces. 

The following records, cards, and tags pertaining to each assigned member 
of the cadre have been brought to a current status: 

Official Passport (certain teams only) 

Health Record — has been verified and is current with regard to all 
required immunizations. Immunization Card DD Form 737 is held by 
each person. (See current BUMEDINST 6230.1 series re: Immuni- 
zation Requirements and Procedures. ) 

_ Dental Record — the Standard Form 103 is up-to-date (valuable means 
"of identification). (BUMED Man. 6-107-8.) 

_ Service Record — the record of emergency data, NAVPERS 1070/602, 
November 1969, is up-to-date. 

_ Pay Record—allotments have been registered to cover insurance, 
bonds, dependents, etc., and have been forwarded to the Navy Finance 
Center. 

_ Identification Tags— (BUPERS Man. 4610150.) 

_ Identification Card — DD Form 2N Active, is current. (BUPERS Man. 
"4620150.) 

_ Geneva Convention I. D. Card— DD Form 528 (BUPERS Man. 4620100) is 
immediately available for each person. 

Secret security clearances have been obtained or requested for all 
senior medical personnel. 

All individuals assigned to the cadre have been advised to: 

Check insurance policies and determine that amounts are adequate 
and beneficiaries are correctly designated. 

_ Make certain that allotments are registered to cover all financial 
obligations, BUPERS Man. 6210120, and to provide the family with 
money while away. 

Check with station legal officer relative to: 

_ A valid last will and testament, e.g., proper number of witness 
signatures according to requirements of various states, etc. 

Power-of- attorney. 

Joint bank account (with wife or next of kin). 

E-3 



Co-ownership of personal property, such as car, stocks, bonds, 
real estate, etc. 

Memo to next of kin regarding location of property or special 
instruments, such as insurance policies, safety boxes, tax 
receipts, deeds, etc. 

Any other personal legal problems. 

Assure that a ready supply of cash will be available. Delays in 
drawing pay under emergency situations are frequent. 

j All individuals assigned to surgical teams are in a physically fit status 
for deployment. 

] All individuals assigned to surgical teams possess and maintain their re- 
quired quantity of uniforms and accessories in readiness for deployment. 

ORDERS /TRANSPORTATION 

J Orders are prepared and are on file for transportation of each cadre 
member when ordered to be deployed. (Destination and reporting instruc- 
tions are to be completed when the cadre is deployed. ) Security certi- 
fication is included as appropriate. 

FOR SURGICAL TEAMS 15 and 19 

] A prospective company commander (one CDR 2100) has been nominated and 
trained to serve if the team is activated as an FMF Surgical Platoon 
Cadre and if BUMED requires this officer for the assigned mission. 



( 



E-4 






FMF SURGICAL PLATOON CADRE 
Mount-out Check List 



APPENDIX F 



(To be completed by FMF Surgical Platoon Cadre senior member) 



PERSONNEL 






List of Male Personnel Assigned: (fill in 


) 




NOTE 
# or * 


RANK/ 
GRADE 


NAME 


SPECIALTY 
CODE 


DUTY 








NOBC 0214 


general surgeon 








NOBC 0244 


orthopedic surgeon 








NOBC 0613 


anesthesiologist 








NOBC 0910 


anesthetist (NC) 








NOBC 0970 


operating room 
nurse 








NOBC 0802 


administrative officer 
(MSC) 








HM-0000 


general service 
hospital corpsman 








HM-8417 


clinical laboratory 
technician 








HM-8442 


medical administrative 
technician (HMC) 








HM-8452 


medical x-ray techn- 
ician (HMC or HMI) 








HM-8483 


operating room 

technician (primary 
NEC) 








HM-8483 


ii 








HM-8483 


it 








HM-8483 


operating room techni- 
cian (primary or 
secondary NEC) 








HM-8483 


tt 








HM-8483 


" 








HM-8489 


orthopedic cast room 
technician 








HM-8482 


pharmacy technician 



Footnote to List of Personnel Assigned 



#Senior member 
"-Member having 



of cadre. 

FMF experience or Field Medical Service School attendance. 

F-l 



PERSONNEL (continued) 

I I All team members have been notified (individually) regarding their alert 
status and regarding changes in the alert status. 

] All team members are physically fit for deployment. 

Check the following records, cards, and tags for all alerted individual 
team members for currency and completeness: 

_ Official Passport (certain teams only) 

_ Health Record — has been verified and is current with regard to all 
required immunizations. Immunization Card DD Form 737 is held by 
each person. (See current BUMEDINST 6230.1 series re: Immuni- 
zation Requirements and Procedures. ) 

_ Dental Record— the Standard Form 103 is up-to-date (valuable means 
of identification). (BUMED Man. 6-107-8.) 

_ Service Record — the record of emergency data, NAVPERS 1070/602, 
November 1969, is up-to-date. 

_ Pay Record—allotments have been registered to cover insurance, 
bonds, dependents, etc. , and have been forwarded to the Navy Finance 
Center. 

_ Identification Tags— (BUPERS Man. 4610150.) 

_ Identification Card— DD Form 2N Active, is current. (BUPERS Man. 
4620150.) 

. _ Geneva Convention I. D. Card— DD Form 528 (BUPERS Man. 4620100) is 
immediately available for each person. 

_ Secret security clearances have been obtained or requested for all 
senior medical personnel. 

|_| Each individual team member possesses and maintains his required quantity 
of uniforms and accessories in readiness for deployment. 

□ TAD orders are issued to each individual team member in accordance with 
■ BUPERSINST 5400.42 series and NAVPERS 15909(_) series, Navy Enlisted 

Transfer Manual. 

□ Individual team members have been directed to report to their appropriate 

commander or off icer-in-charge at their destination for additional TAD 
augmentation assignment. 

□ Deployment travel of individual team members has been certified for Class 

I priority travel in government aircraft.' If no government aircraft was 
available, travel by commercial air has been certified. 

□ The commander requesting the surgical team has been alerted regarding 

transportation requirements. 

\_J Station to departure point and interim transportation transfer has been 
arranged. 

Lj Plans have been developed for arrival at the destination including report- 
ing and a preliminary plan of operation. 



r 



F-2 



FOR SURGICAL TEAMS 15 AND 19 

1 A prospective company commander (one CDR 2100) has been nominated and 
trained to serve if the team is activated as an FMF Surgical Platoon 
Cadre and if BUMED requires this officer for the assigned mission. 



F-3 



Year ( indicate) APPENDIX G 

-1 -2 

Halves (circle) SPONSOR'S INDIVIDUAL AUGMENTEE 

Semiannual Pre-alert Check List 

(To be completed by sponsoring activity) 

□ All individuals required by SECNAVINST 6440. 1 series or requested by NAVPERS 

or BUMED have been selected for individual augmentee duty. 

□ All individuals selected as individual augmentees have been notified in 

writing. 

□ All individuals selected as individual augmentees have been immunized in 

accordance with BUMEDINST 6230.1 series for alerted forces. 

Q No medical officer selected for individual augmentee duty will have his 
residency training interrupted (desirable). 

□ No individual selected for individual augmentee duty has a concurrent augmen- 

tation assignment as a member of a medical team nor has his immediate 
availability been compromised in any way. 

Lj Each individual designated for individual augmentee duty has received a 
complete indoctrination course relating to his duties as an augmentee. 

□ Each designated augmentee has received a list of augmentee related refer- 

ence materials, correspondence courses and training films that are avail- 
able for his use. 

□ Each individual (without previous FMF experience) designated for individual 

augmentee duty has been ordered to attend appropriate courses in Field 
Medical Service School at Camp Lejeune or Camp Pendleton. Note: this 
is to be accomplished when staffing, time, and TAD funds permit. 

The following records, cards, and tags pertaining to all individuals des- 
ignated for individual augmentee duty have been brought to a current 
status: 

_ Official Passport (certain teams only) 

_ Health Record— has been verified and is current with regard to all 
required immunizations. Immunization Card DD Form 737 is held by 
each person. (See current BUMEDINST 6230.1 series re: Immuni- 
zation Requirements and Procedures.) 

_ Dental Record— the Standard Form 103 is up-to-date (valuable means 
of identification). (BUMED Man. 6-107-8. ) 

_ Service Record — the record of emergency data, NAVPERS 1070/602, 
November 1969, is up-to-date. 

_ Pay Record — allotments have been registered to cover insurance, 
bonds, dependents, etc., and have been forwarded to the Navy Finance 
Center. 

_ Identification Tags — (BUPERS Man. 4610150.) 

_ Identification Card — DD Form 2N Active, is current. (BUPERS Man 
4620150.) 






G-l 



Geneva Convention I. D. Card— DD Form 528 (BUPERS Man. 4620100) is 
immediately available for each person. 

Secret security clearances have been obtained or requested for all 
senior medical personnel. 

Each individual designated for augmentee duty has been advised to: 

Check insurance policies and determine that amounts are adequate 
and beneficiaries are correctly designated. 

Make certain that allotments are registered to cover all financial 
" obligations, BUPERS Man. 6210120, and to provide the family with 
money while away. 

Check with station legal officer relative to: t 

A valid last will and testament, e.g., proper number of witness 
signatures according to requirements of various states, etc. 

Power-of -attorney. 

Joint bank account (with wife or next of kin). 

Co-ownership of personal property, such as car, stocks, bonds, 
real estate, etc. 

Memo to next of kin regarding location of property or special 
instruments, such as insurance policies, safety boxes, tax 
receipts, deeds, etc. 

Any other personal legal problems. 

Assure that a ready supply of cash will be available. Delays in 
drawing pay under emergency situations are frequent. 

] Each individual designated for augmentee duty is physically fit for de- 
ployment. 

] Each individual designated for augmentee duty possess and maintains his 
required quantity of uniforms and accessories in readiness for deploy- 
ment. 

ORDERS /TRANSPORTATION 

1 Orders are prepared (with blanks to be completed) and are on file for 
completion when orders are received to deploy the augmentees. 



( 



G-2 









APPENDIX H 
SPONSOR'S INDIVIDUAL AUGMENTEE 
Mount-out Check List 

(To be completed by sponsoring activity) 

] All individuals affected have been notified regarding the alert status and 
regarding changes in the alert status. 

] All individual are physically fit for deployment. 

The following records, cards, and tags for all alerted individuals designa- 
ted for individual augmentee duty are current and complete and prepared 
for delivery (if appropriate) to the individual: 

Official Passport (certain teams only) 

Health Record--has been verified and is current with regard to all 
required immunizations. Immunization Card DD Form 737 is held by 
each person. (See current BUMEDINST 6230.1 series re: Immuni- 
zation Requirements and Procedures. ) 

Dental Record — the Standard Form 103 is up-to-date (valuable means 
"of identification). (BUMED Man. 6-107-8.) 

Service Record — the record of emergency data, NAVPERS 1070/602, 
November 1969, is up-to-date. 

Pay Record—allotments have been registered to cover insurance, 
bonds, dependents, etc., and have been forwarded to the Navy Finance 
Center. 

_ Identification Tags— (BUPERS Man. 4610150.) 

_ Identification Card— DD Form 2N Active, is current. (BUPERS Man. 
4620150. ) 

_ Geneva Convention I.D. Card— DD Form 528 (BUPERS Man. 4620100) is 
immediately available for each person. 

Secret security clearances have been obtained or requested for all 
senior medical personnel. 

1 Each individual designated for individual augmentee duty possesses his re- 
quired quantity of uniforms and accessories in readiness for deployment. 

□ TAD orders are prepared (per BUPERSINST 5440.42 series, and NAVPERS 15909(_) 
series, Navy Enlisted Transfer Manual) for issue to each augmentee. 

J Individuals designated for individual augmentee duty have been specifically 
instructed regarding to whom they shall rep<?rt at their new duty assign- 
ment. 

j Deployment travel of individuals designated for individual augmentee duty 
has been certified for Class I priority travel in government aircraft 
or if government air transportation is not available, travel by com- 
mercial air has been certified. 

] The commanding officer requesting the individual augmentee has been alerted 
regarding personnel and baggage to be transported. 



H-l 



I I Station to departure point and interim transportation transfer has been 
arranged. 

I I Augmentees have been briefed (within security limitations and available 
knowledge) regarding their destination and their anticipated duties- 



( 



H-2 



APPENDIX I 









Year -1 -2 
Halves (circle) 



RANK/ GRADE NAME SPECIALTY 

INDIVIDUAL AUGMENTEE 
Semiannual Pre-alert Check List 

(To be completed by the designated individual) 

I I I have received notification in writing that I am a candidate for augmen- 
tee assignment. 

I | I have received the immunization required for alert forces (BUMEDINST 
6230.1 series). 

I I I have reported any conflicting assignment which may interfere with my 
immediate availability for augmentee assignment to my commanding officer. 

I | I have received an indoctrination course relating to assignment to aug- 
mentee duty. 

I I I have received lists of available reference materials, correspondence 
courses, and training films pertaining to augmentation duty. 

I I have previous FMF experience or: 

I I I have received orders to attend appropriate courses in Field Medical 
Services at Camp Lejeune or Camp Pendleton. 

\\ I have been advised that orders have been prepared for me and are on file 
for my immediate use when I am ordered to be deployed as an individual 
augmentee. 

[\ I have performed the required functions to ensure that the following re- 
cords , cards, and tags pertaining to me are current: 

Health Record — has been verified and is current with regard to all 
required immunizations. Immunization Card DD Form 737 should be held 
by each person. (See current BUMEDINST 6230.1 series.) 

Dental Record--Standard Form 103, is up-to-date (valuable means of 
identification). (BUMED Man. 6-107-8.) 

Service Record — my record of emergency data, NAVPERS 1070/602 November 
1969, is up-to-date. 

Pay Record — all allotments required by me have been registered (in- 
surance, bonds, dependents, etc.) and have been forwarded to the Navy 
Finance Center. 

I have identification tags — (BUPERS Man. 4610150.) 

I have an identification card — DD Form 2N Active and it is current. 
(BUPERS Man. 4620150.) 

A Geneva Convention Card~DD Form 528 (BUPERS Man. 4620100) has been 
prepared for me. 



1-1 



r 



I have executed the required forms to obtain secret security clearance. 

I have been advised to: 

Check insurance policies and determine that amounts are adequate and 
beneficiaries are correctly designated. 

Make certain that allotments are registered to cover all financial 
obligations, and to provide my family with money while I am away. 
(BUPERS Man. 6210120.) 

I have checked with the legal officer relative to: 

Execution of a valid last will and testament, e.g., proper number of 
witness signatures according to requirements of various states, etc. 

Execution of a power -of -attorney. » 

Establishment of a joint bank account (with wife or next of kin). 

— \ 

Assignment of co-ownership of personal property, such as car, stocks, 
bonds, real estate, etc. 

Execution of a memo to my next of kin regarding location of property 
or special instruments, such as insurance policies, safety boxes, tax 
receipts, deeds, etc. 

Clarifying or resolving any other personal legal problems. 

] Assure that I have a ready supply of cash available for my personal re- 
quirements. Delays in drawing pay under emergency situations are fre- 
quent. 

(j I am physically fit for deployment for individual augmentation duty. 

] I possess the required quantity of uniforms and accessories in readiness 
for my deployment. 



1-2 



APPENDIX J 



.- 









RANK/GRADE NAME SPECIALTY 

INDIVIDUAL AUGMENTED 
Mount-out Check List 

(To be completed by designated individual) 

[_] I have received notification of being placed on an alert status. 

[J I make periodic inquiries regarding changes in the alert status and keep 
ray immediate supervisor advised of the location at which I may be con- 
tacted. 

Q I am physically fit for deployment. 

I have the following records, cards, and tags in my possession, and have 
verified that they are complete and current: 

Health Record — Immunization Card DD Form 737 
_ Dental Record — Standard Form 103 
_ Service Record— NAVPERS 1070/602 

Pay Record 

Identification Tags 

_ Identification Card — DD Form 2N Active 

_ Geneva Convention I.D. Card — DD Form 528 

_ Orders which certify my secret security clearance, if appropriate. 

I I I possess (and have packed for deployment) the required quantity of serv- 
iceable uniforms. 

I I I have received my TAD orders. 

n I have received and understand the directive requiring me to report to my 
new commander at the specified destination. 

[~1 M y deployment travel orders are certified for Class I priority travel in 
government aircraft and indicate that if government air travel is not 
available I may travel by commercial air. 

Q I have planned for my arrival at the designated destination and understand 
the procedures for reporting. 



J-l